Fishermen drag a net in Lake Malawi in 2012. About the size of New Jersey, the lake is home to hundreds of fish species and is considered one of the most biologically diverse lakes in the world. Ding Haitao/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Thriving Towns In East Africa Are Good News For A Parasitic Worm
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Contaminated water can spread diseases like cholera and typhoid. A new project aims to provide water filters in the form of an educational book. Soe Than Win/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Filtering A New Idea: A Book That's Educational And 'Drinkable'
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Muslim pilgrims wear masks to prevent infection from the Middle East respiratory syndrome in the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, on Tuesday. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

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How U.S. Hospitals Are Planning To Stop The Deadly MERS Virus
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A farmworker in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, wears a mask to protect against Middle East respiratory syndrome earlier this month. The MERS virus is common in camels. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Shefali Rani Das, an expectant mother in Bangladesh, has given birth to six children (including 4-year-old Suborna) at home without a doctor. Only three of her babies have survived. Colin Crowley/Save the Children hide caption

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Loved ones express their grief at the burial of Ramon Romero Ramirez in Chichigalpa, Nicaragua, January 2013. The 36-year-old died of chronic kidney disease after working in the sugar cane fields for 12 years. Ramirez is part of a steady procession of deaths among cane workers. Ed Kashi/VII hide caption

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Mysterious Kidney Disease Slays Farmworkers In Central America
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By ensuring vaccines are invented and distributed, Bill Gates says, his foundation is dramatically reducing the number of childhood deaths in poor countries. Marie McGrory/NPR hide caption

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Why Bill Gates Fights Diseases Abroad, Not At Home
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An Egyptian Muslim prays during a ritual in Mina, Saudi Arabia, October 2013. Some people wore masks during the hajj pilgrimage last year to protect against the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Gado Labbo holds her 5-year-old son, Yusuf, at a clinic in Dareta, Nigeria. In 2010, when Yusuf first entered the clinic, he had a blood lead level 30 times higher than the amount the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers dangerous. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Chemist Facundo Fernandez of the Georgia Institute of Technology tested morning-after pills collected from 15 different pharmacies in Lima, Peru. Rob Felt/Georgia Tech hide caption

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A child receives a polio vaccine Sunday in Kano, Nigeria. The country is the primary source of the virus in Africa but appears to be making progress against the disease; the current outbreak in Cameroon that has spread to Equatorial Guinea came by way of Chad, not Nigeria. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Polio Hits Equatorial Guinea, Threatens Central Africa
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