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Handshake-Free Zones Target Spread Of Germs In The Hospital

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A groundskeeper at Pinecrest Gardens sprays pesticide to kill mosquitoes in Miami-Dade County, Fla., in 2016. Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

Hospital-acquired infections are a big risk in health care, especially for older or seriously ill patients. Dana Neely/Getty Images hide caption

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Dana Neely/Getty Images

Dr. Thumbi Mwangi, an infectious disease epidemiologist from Kenya, at Howard Theatre in Washington, DC, on Nov. 29, 2016. In the U.S., Mwangi worked on a vaccine for cows that aimed to combat the same disease he saw the bovine battle in Kenya as a kid. Akash Ghai/for NPR hide caption

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Akash Ghai/for NPR

Fishermen in Papua New Guinea, living on their boats, wait for the tide to change before going out to fish. Tuberculosis is a major health threat in the Pacific Ocean nation. Jason South/The AGE/Fairfax Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason South/The AGE/Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Researchers used online data to model the vaccination rate in communities affected by an outbreak of mumps in Arkansas. Maimuna Majumder/HealthMap; Alyson Hurt/NPR hide caption

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Maimuna Majumder/HealthMap; Alyson Hurt/NPR

Tucker Lane and his mother, Lynn Cash, sit in the wooded backyard of his home in West Barnstable, Mass. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

Beyond Lyme: New Tick-Borne Diseases On The Rise In U.S.

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Pig farm workers push live pigs into a large grave in Nipah in 1999. To stop the outbreak, the Malaysian government culled almost 1 million pigs, nearly destroying the country's pork industry. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

A Taste For Pork Helped A Deadly Virus Jump To Humans

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Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Heat and steam from your shower or shave can rob medicine of its potency long before the drug's expiration date. Angela Cappetta/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Cappetta/Getty Images

When Old Medicine Goes Bad

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Under the old rules, the CDC's authority was primarily limited to detaining travelers entering the U.S. or crossing state lines. With the new rules, the CDC would be able to detain people anywhere in the country, without getting approval from state and local officials. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

CDC Seeks Controversial New Quarantine Powers To Stop Outbreaks

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Keishla Mojica, 23, lives in Cuagas, Puerto Rico. She was infected with Zika virus while pregnant and expects to give birth in early January. Carmen Heredia Rodriguez/KHN hide caption

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Carmen Heredia Rodriguez/KHN

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles has been penalized in all three years since the creation of a Medicare program to reduce patient-safety issues in hospitals. FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images/Getty Images hide caption

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FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images/Getty Images

Samples from this 17th century Lithuanian mummy were found to house samples of variola, the virus that causes smallpox. Kiril Cachovski/Lithuanian Mummy Project hide caption

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Kiril Cachovski/Lithuanian Mummy Project

A Mummy's DNA May Help Solve The Mystery Of The Origins Of Smallpox

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In 1876, O.G. Mason, Bellevue's official photographer, took a carefully staged photograph of a blood transfusion in progress. Courtesy of the Lillian and Clarence de la Chapelle Medical Archives at NYU/Doubleday hide caption

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Courtesy of the Lillian and Clarence de la Chapelle Medical Archives at NYU/Doubleday

Bellevue Hospital Pioneered Care For Presidents And Paupers

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