Aedes aegypti mosquito photographed through a microscope. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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CDC: 157 Pregnant Women In The U.S. Have Tested Positive For Zika
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In some parts of the country, this might require bug spray. Steven Errico/Getty Images hide caption

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Who Should Be Worried About Zika And What Should They Do?
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Kelli Glenn holds a photo of her father while he was in the hospital. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Suddenly Paralyzed, 2 Men Struggle To Recover From Guillain-Barre
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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger
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Standing water and abandoned tires make Houston's Fifth Ward hospitable for mosquitoes. Courtesy of Anna Grove Photography hide caption

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Houston Prepares Now For Zika's Potential Arrival This Summer
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Mariel Mohns and Mustafa Rasheed are working in a University of Wisconsin lab that's trying to figure out how Zika virus could be damaging fetuses. Courtesy of Kristi L. Hall hide caption

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Scientists Report In Real Time On Challenging Zika Research
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A woman who is six months pregnant shows a photo of her ultrasound at the IMIP hospital in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, on Wednesday. Scientists are trying to figure out how Zika virus may be affecting fetuses. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Study Finds Multiple Problems In Fetuses Exposed To Zika Virus
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Ebola virus particles (blue) emerge from a chronically infected African green monkey cell. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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'Pandemic' Asks: Is A Disease That Will Kill Tens Of Millions Coming?
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A health worker in Lima, Peru, fumigates against the mosquito that spreads Zika virus, dengue and chikungunya. Martin Mejia/AP hide caption

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How Scientists Misread The Threat Of Zika Virus
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