Fleas carry the bacteria that cause cat-scratch fever, so if your kitty is flea-free, you should be in the clear. Sara Lynn Paige/Getty Images hide caption

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The FDA says there's no evidence that antibacterial soaps do a better job cleaning hands, and chemicals in them may pose health hazards. The FDA ban applies only to consumer products, not those used in hospitals and food service settings. Mike Kemp/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Scopes used to diagnose gastrointestinal problems are typically cleaned and reused. Dave King/Dorling Kindersley/Science Museum, London/Science Source hide caption

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Surgeon General Vivek Murthy looks at a sample of mosquitoes in Orlando, Fla., on Monday. With him is Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell and Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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A Broward County, Fla., employee takes water samples in a yard to test for mosquito larvae in June. It's part of the county's mosquito control program. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is updating its guidelines on preventing transmission of Zika virus via sexual activity. Stephanie Lynn/Flickr Flash/Getty Images hide caption

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Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

Sick? People Say They Still Go To Work, Even When They Shouldn't

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Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which have been known to carry the Zika virus, buzz in a laboratory in Cucuta, Colombia. Ricardo Mazalan/AP hide caption

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'Nobody Is Immune': Bracing For Zika's First Summer In The U.S.

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A silver-haired bat, the type that transmitted rabies to a woman in Wyoming after apparently biting her while she slept. Lyn Alweis/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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