Under the microscope, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. The germs that cause TB have become resistant to many drugs. Janice Haney Carr/CDC hide caption

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When a case of the potentially lethal H5N1 bird flu was found in British poultry in 2007, Dutch farmers were told to keep their poultry away from wild birds by closing off outdoor areas with wire mesh. Ed Oudenaarden/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Different types of coronaviruses can cause a simple cold or a deadly respiratory illness, such as SARS. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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After testing negative for Ebola, Magdalena Nyamurungi returns home with a new set of belongings from the World Health Organization. Medical workers burned and buried her possessions when they suspected she was infected. B. Sensasi/Courtesy of WHO hide caption

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A railway worker wearing protective clothing to ward off the SARS virus controls a line of travelers as they wait to enter Beijing's West Railway Station Tuesday in 2003. Greg Baker/AP hide caption

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When New Diseases Emerge, Experts Are Faster On The Uptake

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Bats harbor many types of coronaviruses and were probably the original source of the new coronavirus that appeared in the Middle East. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Cheryl Gleasner, a research technologist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, works with a genome sequencing machine designed for disease surveillance. Since the SARS epidemic in 2003, advances in sequencing technologies have greatly speed up the ability to detect and track a new virus. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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The genetic factors responsible for a cat's stripes might help researchers understand disease resistance in humans. kennymatic via Flickr hide caption

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Could Genes For Stripes Help Kitty Fight Disease?

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A medical worker from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention works at the laboratory where Ebola specimens from the Congo were tested at the start of the latest outbreak. Stephen Wandera/AP hide caption

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Ebola's Other Victims: Health Care Workers

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A medical worker from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention works at the laboratory in Uganda where Ebola specimens were tested at the start of the latest outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Stephen Wandera/Associated Press hide caption

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