Donald Trump speaks from the 9th tee at his new Trump Turnberry Resort Friday in Ayr, Scotland. Trump endorsed the U.K. decision to leave the European Union even though Scotland was against it. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Leaders Divided Over UK's Vote To Exit EU

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Donald Trump played a round of golf after his Trump International Golf Links Course opened in July 2012 in Balmedie, Scotland, near Aberdeen. Ian MacNicol/Getty Images hide caption

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Anti-Trump Voices Grow Louder In Scotland After Development Rift

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An artist's rendering of sauropods that once roamed in a lagoon area on Scotland's Isle of Skye. Jon Hoad/University of Edinburgh hide caption

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Before There Were Tourists, Dinosaurs Strolled Scotland's Isle Of Skye

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An artist's rendering of what Dearcmhara shawcrossi probably looked like in dinosaur times. Todd Marshall/University of Edinburgh hide caption

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Ancient Scottish Sea Reptile Not 'Nessie,' But Just As Cute

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For The Sophisticated Souse, Fabric Infused With A Whiff Of Whiskey

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In the northwestern United States, this crayfish would be just a friendly bit of local fauna. But in Scotland, it's an invasive species wreaking havoc on trout streams. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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American Intruder Lurks In Scottish Streams, Clawed And Hungry

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British Prime Minister David Cameron said Friday now that voters in Scotland have rejected independence, he is committed to giving more powers not only to Scotland, but also to "the people of England, Wales and Northern Ireland." Lefteris Pitarakis/AP hide caption

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Scotland lowered the voting age to 16 for Thursday's referendum on whether to remain part of the United Kingdom or opt for independence. It was widely assumed the teenagers would overwhelmingly vote for independence, but that doesn't appear to be the case. Scott Heppell/AP hide caption

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For Scotland's 16-Year-Olds, The First Vote Will Be On Independence

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The Saltire, the flag of Scotland, flies near the Union Jack in Gretna in Scotland. Some economists say Thursday's vote on Scotland's independence could have wide-ranging economic impacts. Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A tourist wears a poncho decorated with the national flag of Scotland to shelter from the weather in Scotland's capital, Edinburgh, on Monday. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Will Scotland Vote To Cut The Cord?

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The clubhouse of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews sits just off the first tee. The course itself is open to the public — women as well as men. But women have never been allowed to join the club since its founding in 1754, and are not allowed to enter the clubhouse, even as guests. Doug Tribou/NPR hide caption

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Scotland's Really Big Vote: Can Women Join St. Andrews Golf Club?

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