Shigeru Miyamoto plays the latest Mario game, called Super Mario Maker, at the Nintendo booth Wednesday at this year's E3 video game expo in Los Angeles. Travis Larchuk/NPR hide caption

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Video game designer Shigeru Miyamoto introduces Nintendo's Super Mario Maker at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles in 2014. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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The Legendary Mr. Miyamoto, Father Of Mario And Donkey Kong

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A Southwest Airlines passenger thanks Mario for giving away free Wii U systems on a flight from New Orleans to Dallas in November. Matt Strasen/Matt Strasen/Invision/AP hide caption

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Game Over For Nintendo? Not If Mario And Zelda Fans Keep Playing

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Hiroshi Yamauchi (left), with the founder of Kyocera, Kazuo Inamori, in 2000. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hiroshi Yamauchi, Nintendo's Visionary President, Dies

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Sony Computer Entertainment President and CEO Andrew House introduces the new PlayStation 4 at an Electronic Entertainment Expo media briefing in Los Angeles on Monday. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Players found that male characters could marry one another and raise children in Nintendo's 3DS game Tomodachi Collection: New Life. The company is reportedly removing that option. An image shows Nintendo's webpage for the game. NPR hide caption

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Nintendo's Wii U is the only new game system on the horizon as console makers are having a hard time figuring out how to improve on what they've got. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Is The Cloud In Gamers' Future?

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