Moyaad Saad, a 43-year-old former civil servant from Baghdad, feeds his 6-month-old daughter Zahara on their cot in a giant tent at a makeshift migrant camp near the border between Greece and Macedonia. Thousands of asylum seekers are now stuck here after several European countries closed their borders to them. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Joanna Kakissis for NPR

As Europe Closes Door To Refugees, Tough Choices For 2 Fathers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476498715/476498716" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pope Francis (right) embraces Patriarch Bartholomew I, spiritual leader of the world's Orthodox Christians, during their joint visit to a center for migrants on the Greek island of Lesbos on Saturday. Both called on Europe to show greater compassion in dealing with migrants. Petros Giannakouris/AP hide caption

toggle caption Petros Giannakouris/AP

The mothers of Militsa Kamvysi, 83, (left) and Maritsa Mavrapidou, 85, arrived on the Greek island of Lesbos nearly a century ago as refugees from what was then the Ottoman Empire (now Turkey). "We welcomed refugees because we're descended from refugees, too," Mavrapidou says. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Kainaz Amaria/NPR

For These Greek Grandmas, Helping Migrants Brings Back Their Own Past

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474240695/474325056" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Migrants and refugees pull down a border fence during clashes with Macedonian forces Sunday near a makeshift migrant camp in the northern Greek border village of Idomeni. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

Pakistani refugees go on a hunger strike during a protest against the EU's deportation deal with Turkey at Moria Refugee Camp in Lesbos, Greece, on Wednesday. The pope and the Orthodox Church's ecumenical patriarch may be visiting the island soon. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Joanna Kakissis On Morning Edition: Pope Francis May Travel To Greek Island

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473209431/473216793" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A boy plays in a puddle at a makeshift camp occupied by migrants and refugees at the Greek-Macedonian border near the village of Idomeni on Thursday. Andrej Isakovic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Andrej Isakovic/AFP/Getty Images

Fernando Boiteux tosses Emily, a remote-controlled lifesaving device, into the waters off the shore of the Greek island of Lesbos. Boiteux, an assistant fire chief from Los Angeles, is helping train Greek first responders to use Emily. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Joanna Kakissis for NPR

How A High-Tech Buoy Named Emily Could Save Migrants Off Greece

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471285293/471349075" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

European Council President Donald Tusk (front center) shakes hands with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (front row, second from left) during a group photo at an EU summit Monday in Brussels. Francois Walschaerts/AP hide caption

toggle caption Francois Walschaerts/AP

At a makeshift burial ground in Samos, beyond the edges of a Greek Orthodox cemetery, lie the bodies of three Syrian children. The marker reads, "The child Noaman Tamim Shibly — For us Allah suffices, and he is the best disposer of affairs. To God we belong, and to him we shall return." Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Despite Aegean Rescuers' Best Efforts, Not All Migrants Are Saved

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467381719/467468471" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sinking boat is seen behind a Turkish gendarme off the coast of Canakkale's Bademli district on Saturday. At least 35 migrants drowned when their boat sank in the Aegean Sea while trying to cross from Turkey to Greece. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Volunteers help Afghan and Syrian migrants off a rubber boat on a rocky beach in northern Lesbos, Greece. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Joanna Kakissis for NPR

After Drownings, Greece-Bound Migrants Who Survived The Journey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463990926/464090962" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman holds her baby as she waits with other migrants on the Greek side of the fence along the border with Macedonia on Sunday. Macedonian is only allowing in refugees from the war-torn countries of Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. Those not allowed into Macedonia are being bused to a sports stadium in Athens. Petros Giannakouris/AP hide caption

toggle caption Petros Giannakouris/AP

Migrants Hit A Roadblock On The Greece-Macedonia Border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/459241177/459250108" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Asylum-seekers gather outside a camp on the island of Lesbos where they're supposed to be screened quickly. But sometimes the wait can last days. Jodi Hilton hide caption

toggle caption Jodi Hilton

To Keep Track Of Migrants, EU Sets Up 'Hot Spots'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/454034639/454342323" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Syrian refugee woman cries by one of her children as she and family members arrive in an overcrowded dinghy on the Greek island of Lesbos after crossing a part of the Aegean Sea from the Turkish coast, on Saturday. Yannis Behrakis/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Yannis Behrakis/Reuters/Landov

Selma Halik, holding her 2-year-old daughter Amara at a refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos, says much of her family was wiped out by ISIS. She doesn't want her daughter to see the things she's seen. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Peter Kenyon/NPR

On Greek Island, Syrians And Iraqis Find Respite Before Moving On

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/441539138/441701852" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Migrants from Africa receive instruction in French in the port city of Calais. Some 3,000 migrants live in a makeshift camp known as "The Jungle." Most are seeking to travel on to Britain, while some are seeking asylum in France. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ari Shapiro/NPR

Migrants queue to continue their journey north at a newly built registration and transit center near Gevgelija, Macedonia, on Sunday. More than 5,000 migrants crossed into Serbia on Sunday, resuming a journey to western Europe after an overwhelmed Macedonia gave up its attempts to stem the flow of mainly Syrian refugees by force. Ognen Teofilovski/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Ognen Teofilovski/Reuters/Landov

Former Energy Minister Panagiotis Lafazanis speaks during a news conference at Parliament in Athens, Greece, on Friday. He's leading rebels who decided to break away from the ruling Syriza party over objections to an international bailout plan. Stoyan Nenov/Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption Stoyan Nenov/Reuters /Landov

Syrian refugees prepare to board the passenger ship Eleftherios Venizelos at Kos's main port on Sunday in Kos, Greece. The vessel will house more than 2,500 refugees and migrants who entered the country from the Turkish coast. Milos Bicanski/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Milos Bicanski/Getty Images