Protesters hold Greek flags, including one saying "No," during a demonstration at the Greek parliament on July 5, marking the first anniversary of a referendum in which Greeks voted against austerity. Soon after the vote, the prime minister accepted a new bailout deal for Greece imposing even tougher austerity than before. Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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With Brexit, Greeks Worry About Europe's Future And Their Place In It

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Antikythera team members Nikolas Giannoulakis, Theotokis Theodoulou, and Brendan Foley inspect small finds from the shipwreck, while decompressing after a dive of 165 feet beneath the surface of the Mediterranean Sea in Greece. Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO hide caption

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Ancient Shipwreck Off Greek Island Yields A Different Sort Of Treasure

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Police officers patrol among tents during evacuation operations Tuesday at the Idomeni camp near the Greek-Macedonian border. Yannis Kolesidis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Moyaad Saad, a 43-year-old former civil servant from Baghdad, feeds his 6-month-old daughter Zahara on their cot in a giant tent at a makeshift migrant camp near the border between Greece and Macedonia. Thousands of asylum seekers are now stuck here after several European countries closed their borders to them. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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As Europe Closes Door To Refugees, Tough Choices For 2 Fathers

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Pope Francis (right) embraces Patriarch Bartholomew I, spiritual leader of the world's Orthodox Christians, during their joint visit to a center for migrants on the Greek island of Lesbos on Saturday. Both called on Europe to show greater compassion in dealing with migrants. Petros Giannakouris/AP hide caption

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The mothers of Militsa Kamvysi, 83, (left) and Maritsa Mavrapidou, 85, arrived on the Greek island of Lesbos nearly a century ago as refugees from what was then the Ottoman Empire (now Turkey). "We welcomed refugees because we're descended from refugees, too," Mavrapidou says. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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For These Greek Grandmas, Helping Migrants Brings Back Their Own Past

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Migrants and refugees pull down a border fence during clashes with Macedonian forces Sunday near a makeshift migrant camp in the northern Greek border village of Idomeni. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pakistani refugees go on a hunger strike during a protest against the EU's deportation deal with Turkey at Moria Refugee Camp in Lesbos, Greece, on Wednesday. The pope and the Orthodox Church's ecumenical patriarch may be visiting the island soon. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis On Morning Edition: Pope Francis May Travel To Greek Island

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A boy plays in a puddle at a makeshift camp occupied by migrants and refugees at the Greek-Macedonian border near the village of Idomeni on Thursday. Andrej Isakovic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fernando Boiteux tosses Emily, a remote-controlled lifesaving device, into the waters off the shore of the Greek island of Lesbos. Boiteux, an assistant fire chief from Los Angeles, is helping train Greek first responders to use Emily. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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How A High-Tech Buoy Named Emily Could Save Migrants Off Greece

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European Council President Donald Tusk (front center) shakes hands with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (front row, second from left) during a group photo at an EU summit Monday in Brussels. Francois Walschaerts/AP hide caption

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At a makeshift burial ground in Samos, beyond the edges of a Greek Orthodox cemetery, lie the bodies of three Syrian children. The marker reads, "The child Noaman Tamim Shibly — For us Allah suffices, and he is the best disposer of affairs. To God we belong, and to him we shall return." Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Despite Aegean Rescuers' Best Efforts, Not All Migrants Are Saved

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A sinking boat is seen behind a Turkish gendarme off the coast of Canakkale's Bademli district on Saturday. At least 35 migrants drowned when their boat sank in the Aegean Sea while trying to cross from Turkey to Greece. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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