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Saturn has a rocky surface, but it's deep beneath the clouds. That makes it hard to tell exactly how long the day is. NASA hide caption

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Strontium atoms floating in the center of this photo are the heart of the world's most precise clock. The clock is so exact that it can detect tiny shifts in the flow of time itself. Courtesy of the Ye group and Brad Baxley/JILA hide caption

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Science

New Clock May End Time As We Know It

Scientists working to create the perfect atomic clock have a fundamental problem: Right now, on the ceiling, time is passing just a bit faster than it is on the floor.

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The Concorde was fast and changed how we thought about travel here on Earth. In the future, we may well travel at speeds that change our relationship with time itself. David Parker/Getty Images hide caption

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The Cathedral Spires in the Black Hills of South Dakota are just one of innumerable formations across the planet that speak to the Earth's ancient history. K. Scott Jackson/Ohio Water Science Center/USGS hide caption

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