Customers use interactive kiosks to place orders at Eatsa, a fully automated fast food restaurant in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As Our Jobs Are Automated, Some Say We'll Need A Guaranteed Basic Income

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San Francisco's Mission District will be one of four additional neighborhoods given preferential access to an affordable senior housing complex in an agreement between the city and the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

About 5,000 people have entered the lottery for the proposed Willie B. Kennedy development in San Francisco's Western Addition neighborhood. Courtesy of Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corp. hide caption

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Courtesy of Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corp.

How 'Equal Access' Is Helping Drive Black Renters Out Of Their Neighborhood

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Uber, the San Francisco-based ride-hailing service has been dealt a legal setback in its effort to settle a multi-million dollar claim by drivers who say they should be reclassified as employees, not independent contractors. On Thursday, a federal judge rejected Uber's $100 million settlement offer. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

A group of men clean a week's haul of seabird eggs. Arthur Bolton/California Academy of Sciences hide caption

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Arthur Bolton/California Academy of Sciences

The Gold-Hungry Forty-Niners Also Plundered Something Else: Eggs

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Geology enthusiasts gather at a (formerly) noteworthy curb in Hayward, Calif., in May 2012. The curb was once straight; the shifting Hayward fault pulled it apart. Courtesy of Andrew Alden hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Alden

In California, Fixing A Curb Destroyed The 'Holy Grail Of Seismology'

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Larry Pascua hugs a friend Monday in San Francisco amid flowers and other items left as a memorial to those killed in the attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Shootings Prompt Cities To Consider More Security For Pride Events

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Lines of travelers at Denver International Airport snake their way through security on Thursday. RJ Sangosti/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/Denver Post via Getty Images

Cities Consider Privatizing TSA To Speed Up Checkpoints, But Would It?

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San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr resigned on Thursday after losing the support of Mayor Ed Lee, who had backed him despite several racially-charged incidents in the department. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Workers install solar panels on the roof of a home in Camarillo, Calif., in 2013. San Francisco has recently decided to start requiring rooftop solar systems — electrical or heating — on new construction up to 10 stories tall. Anne Cusack/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Anne Cusack/LA Times via Getty Images

Supporters watch as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks to promote his paid family leave initiative at a rally in Manhattan on March 10. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Paid Family Leave Advocates Celebrate A Big Week, But The Battle's Not Over

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Alphonzo Jackson holds his 6-month-old son, Isaiah, behind Kim Turner and her daughter Adelaide Turner Winn during a rally supporting paid family leave at City Hall in San Francisco on Tuesday. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Mercy, a San Francisco-­based nonprofit, provides subsidized affordable housing for low-income residents, including 25 apartments reserved for 18- to 24-­year-­olds. Shawn Wen/Youth Radio hide caption

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Shawn Wen/Youth Radio

In San Francisco, An Affordable Housing Solution That Helps Millennials

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