Saying that not all businesses are following a current equal-pay standard, Iceland's Prime Minister Bjarni Benediktsson is moving to require companies to prove they pay equal amounts to male and female workers. Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

The northern lights over Iceland in February. The glowing orange area on the left side are the lights of the capital, Reykjavik. Jamie Cooper/SSPL via Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Cooper/SSPL via Getty Images

Icelandic Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson attends a session of Parliament in the country's capital city, Reykjavik, on Monday. Halldor Kolbeins/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Halldor Kolbeins/AFP/Getty Images

Iceland Finds Itself In The Middle Of Panama Papers Leak

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Semlor served at FIKA in New York City. "The interest [in semlor] is huge," says Lena Khoury, the Swedish cafe chain's director of strategy and communications. Courtesy of FIKA hide caption

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Courtesy of FIKA

Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Iceland, speaks during the 69th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters on Monday. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

A plane flies over the Bardarbunga volcano as it spews lava and smoke in southeast Iceland on Sept. 14. The Bardarbunga volcano system has been rocked by hundreds of tremors a day since mid-August, prompting fears the volcano could explode. Bernard Meric/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernard Meric/AFP/Getty Images