Nesrine Kenza (right) wears a burkini at the beach with two friends in Marseille, France, on Aug. 29. Courts have struck down bans on the burkini, but the debate has carried on and is now being raised by presidential candidates. AP hide caption

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AP

Beach Season Winds Down, But Burkini Debate Rages On In France

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Burkini bans in France have sparked international outrage. In London, people recently held a "Wear what you want beach party" outside France's embassy. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A sculpture of a cigarette butt inside Paris' Gare de Lyon railway station in 2012. France's Parliament sought to crack down on health hazards at the time. Another attempt is currently underway to curb smoking, which remains high among French teens. Remy de la Mauviniere/AP hide caption

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Remy de la Mauviniere/AP

For French Teens, Smoking Still Has More Allure Than Stigma

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Those who were helped by Portugal's consul general, Aristides de Sousa Mendes, during World War II assemble outside the former Portuguese consulate in Bordeaux. Sousa Mendes issued 10,000 visas to Jews including Stephen Rozenfeld (center front, in blue), George Helft (center front, in white) and Lissy Jarvik (third from right), before being recalled and dismissed from the diplomatic service. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

'Portugal's Schindler' Is Remembered, Decades After His Lifesaving Deeds

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A Muslim faithful woman sits as she attends a Mass in tribute to priest Jacques Hamel at the Saint-Leu Saint-Gilles Bagnolet's Church, near Paris on Sunday. Thomas Samson /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Samson /AFP/Getty Images

Two sisters, Majda (left) and Amina Belaroui, answered the call to volunteer for the French military reserves following the recent terrorist attack in Nice. But Majda refused to remove her headscarf, as required under a French law. Amina didn't want to remove her scarf either, but reluctantly agreed to do so. Courtesy of Majda and Amina Belaroui hide caption

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Courtesy of Majda and Amina Belaroui

A French police officer stands guard by Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray's city hall after a priest was killed and hostages taken at a church in the small town on Tuesday. Police say they killed two hostage-takers in the attack in the Normandy town, 77 miles north of Paris. Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images

French flags are seen lowered at half-staff in Nice on July 16. The truck attack on July 14 killed 84 people. "I felt coming to celebrate on holiday and people are in mourning didn't seem right," one vacationer says. "But I'm glad I came." Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images

In Nice, Residents And Tourists Struggle To Adjust After Attack

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A woman lights a candle on Monday in Nice, France, near a makeshift memorial for the victims of the deadly Bastille Day attack. Valery Hache /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Valery Hache /AFP/Getty Images

People gather at a makeshift memorial to honor the victims of an attack on Friday, near the area where a truck mowed through revelers in Nice, France. Laurent Cipriani/AP hide caption

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Laurent Cipriani/AP

NPR's Scott Simon and his family enjoyed the Bastille Day fireworks in Deauville, France. Scott Simon/NPR hide caption

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Scott Simon/NPR

Balancing Safety And Celebration On The Streets Of France

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A forensic expert walks on near the seafront in Nice to gather evidence and transport the dead on Friday. A French-Tunisian attacker killed more than 80 people as he drove a truck through crowds watching fireworks on Thursday night. Clément Mahoudeau/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

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Clément Mahoudeau/IP3/Getty Images

People lay flowers Friday near the seafront in Nice in tribute to victims of Thursday's truck attack that killed more than 80 people. France has suffered three major terrorist attacks since 2015 and appears as vulnerable as any Western nation. Clément Mahoudeau/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

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Clément Mahoudeau/IP3/Getty Images

Forensic police investigate a truck at the scene of a terror attack on the Promenade des Anglais on Thursday evening in Nice, France. A French-Tunisian attacker killed 84 people as he drove a truck through crowds gathered to watch a fireworks display during Bastille Day celebrations. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

Flowers are laid out near the site of the truck attack in Nice. The attack ended when police shot and killed the driver. Luca Bruno/AP hide caption

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Luca Bruno/AP

Darryl Curtis: 'It was awful ... I was afraid'

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