Nicolas Dupont-Aignan (left) and Marine Le Pen at a joint press conference in Paris on April 29, where Le Pen declared she would appoint Dupont-Aignan prime minister if elected. Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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French far-right candidate Marine Le Pen's National Front party now has a new interim leader, after Jean-Francois Jalkh (right) stepped down over comments about the Holocaust. The two are seen here at the Elysee in 2014. Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images

Police officers block access to the Champs Elysees in Paris after a shooting on Thursday. France's Interior Ministry said the attacker was killed in the incident on the world-famous boulevard. Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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French Presidential candidates: Jean-Luc Melenchon (left), Francois Fillon, Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP and Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Bonaventure/AFP and Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images

Marine Le Pen, presidential candidate of the far-right National Front, waves on stage during a campaign rally in Paris on April 17. Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images hide caption

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The Far Right's Marine Le Pen Courts France's Female Voters

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French Presidential Candidate Emmanuel Macron addresses voters during a political meeting on April 17 in Paris. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

French Presidential Candidate Macron Takes Page From American Political Playbook

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Conservative French presidential candidate Francois Fillon delivers a speech April 9 during a campaign meeting in Paris. The two-round presidential election is set for April 23 and May 7. Fillon has played up his religion during the campaign, and that has played well with France's Catholics. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

Conservative French Presidential Nominee's Unusual Tactic: Tout His Faith

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Despite Corruption Charges, French Catholics Stand Behind Francois Fillon

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Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower's driver, Elsie Hargrave, and Sgt. Michael McKeogh, his orderly, were married at Versailles during World War II. The Battle of the Bulge broke out the same day, so Eisenhower had to leave the reception early. Courtesy of Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum

Conservative French presidential candidate Francois Fillon during a visit to the Konrad Adenauer Foundation in Berlin in January. Rainer Jensen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rainer Jensen/AFP/Getty Images

"Many people don't even want to vote," says farmer Erwan Humbert (right), 44, working in his field in Longpont-sur-Orge. "And they don't want to hear about politics anymore." Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

In A French Town, Voters Try To Make Sense Of An Election Race Like No Other

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Philippe Mora, whose father made life-saving baguettes during WWII, displays his graphic of his father, Georges Mora, and his godfather, Marcel Marceau, making mayonnaise together. Courtesy of NOISE Film PR hide caption

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Courtesy of NOISE Film PR

French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron, an independent who started the "En Marche!" (On the Move) movement, is neck and neck with National Front candidate Marine le Pen. Macron is seen here in Paris today. Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images

A committee of the European Parliament voted to strip French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen of the diplomatic immunity that comes with her role as a member of the EU governing body, over tweets showing graphic violence by members of ISIS. David Vincent/AP hide caption

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David Vincent/AP

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen attends the 2017 Agriculture Fair on Tuesday in Paris. Christophe Ena/AP hide caption

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Christophe Ena/AP

In A Heated Campaign Season, French Politicians Flock To Paris Farm Fair

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Emmanuel Macron has a photo taken with fans in the southern town of Carpentras, where he campaigned earlier this month. Macron has bucked the two-party system to run as an independent. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Political Outsider Emmanuel Macron Campaigns To 'Make France Daring Again'

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A limestone slab engraved with an image of an aurochs, or extinct wild cow, discovered at Abri Blanchard in 2012. Ph. Jugie/Musée National de Préhistoire hide caption

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Ph. Jugie/Musée National de Préhistoire

Could this dapper gentleman be Marcel Proust? If it is, as a Canadian professor believes, it would mark the first time the great French author was found in film footage. Le Point/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Le Point/Screenshot by NPR