French President Nicolas Sarkozy after Sunday's vote. Marc Piasecki/Getty Images hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley on 'Morning Edition'
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A butcher shop in Paris, which prominently advertises that it sells halal meat. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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French police officers at the scene of the siege today in Toulouse, where a suspect in recent killings is said to be holed up in an apartment. Pascal Guyot /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Young people walk away from the Ozar Hatorah Jewish school, on Monday in Toulouse, southwestern France, where at least four people (three of them children) were killed and one seriously wounded when a gunman opened fire. It was the third gun attack in a week by a man who fled on a motorbike. Remy Gabalda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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French President Nicolas Sarkozy listens to a butcher during a visit to the butchery pavilion at the Rungis international food market, near Paris, in February. Anna Maria Jakub/Getty Images hide caption

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In France, Politicians Make Halal Meat A Campaign Issue
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A McDonald's breakfast meal in Villeurbanne, France includes fresh baguettes and jam spreads with coffee for $4.55. Juste Philippe/Maxppp /Landov hide caption

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Peace symbol? Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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The Dream Of Europe And The Bailout Of Greece
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June 6, 2011, file photo: Dominique Strauss-Kahn during a hearing in New York State Supreme Court. Allan Tannenbaum /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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French President Nicolas Sarkozy. Philippe Lopez /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR's Renee Montagne talks with Arthur Goldhammer
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An unidentified veiled woman, flanked by friends, was taken away by police officers in Paris earlier today (April 11, 2011). France's new ban on Islamic face veils was met with a burst of defiance, as several women appeared veiled in front of Paris' Notre Dame Cathedral. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley, from Paris
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