WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange raises his fist before addressing reporters from the balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London on Friday. In his speech, Assange said there are still plenty of legal battles still to wage: "The proper war is just commencing." Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

Army Pvt. Chelsea Manning was released Wednesday from Fort Leavenworth, a military prison in Kansas. In January, then-President Barack Obama commuted Manning's 35-year prison sentence after she requested clemency. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Riedel/AP

Director Laura Poitras began filming WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in 2011. Praxis Films hide caption

toggle caption
Praxis Films

'Risk' Is A Messy, Ambitious Portrait Of WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/526862370/527071288" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A seal at the CIA headquarters, photographed in February 2016. The alleged CIA documents reveal a hacking program that is very different from the one uncovered by Edward Snowden's NSA leak. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

The Central Intelligence Agency logo is seen at CIA Headquarters in Langley, Va., in 2016. In a statement accompanying the document release, WikiLeaks alleges that the CIA has recently "lost control of the majority of its hacking arsenal." Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Chelsea Manning had been sentenced to 35 years for leaking military secrets to WikiLeaks. Civil liberties groups have praised President Obama's decision to commute the sentence, but some Republican leaders are outraged. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (center) talks with National Security Agency and Cyber Command chief Adm. Michael Rogers prior to testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Police officers are surrounded by media as they stand outside the Ecuadorean Embassy in London on Monday, where WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was set to be questioned over a rape allegation against him. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

Marco Rubio, R-Fla., is urging other Republicans not to use the WikiLeaks revelations given that U.S. intelligence officials say the emails are a product of a hack with foreign government influence. John Raoux/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Raoux/AP

Ecuador has been hosting WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in its embassy in London for more than four years. Ecuador acknowledged Tuesday it has limited his Internet access because of the website's release of stolen emails that have affected the U.S. presidential campaign DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images