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Anna Akana, a bespectacled, 25-year-old comedian who writes, directs and stars in skits about everything from personal stories, to friendship and even dealing with anxiety, says she is sort of over YouTube. Anna Akana/Screenshot via YouTube hide caption

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Anna Akana/Screenshot via YouTube

For Online Video Stars, YouTube Is No Longer The Only Stage

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Alan Doan likes the fact that Missouri Star Quilt Co. is following in the footsteps of fellow Hamilton native J.C. Penney, but Doan's never been into an actual J.C. Penney store. Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Frank Morris/KCUR

One Family Revitalizes A Small Town With, Yes, Quilts

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A new Manhattan studio joins YouTube Spaces in London, Tokyo and Los Angeles. Media analysts say YouTube hopes content produced there will ultimately get viewers to stay longer on the site. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

Beyond Cat Videos: YouTube Bets On Production Studio 'Playgrounds'

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A screengrab shows YouTube user DisneyCollector opening an egg surprise toy on one of her many videos. DisneyCollector's channel has more than 2 million subscribers. DisneyCollector/YouTube hide caption

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DisneyCollector/YouTube

Surprise! Kids Love Unboxing Videos Too

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Actress Cindy Lee Garcia (right) brought a copyright claim against Google with the help of attorney Cris Armenta over the film Innocence of Muslims, which was posted to YouTube in 2012. Jason Redmond/AP hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AP

Anti-Muslim Video Still Stirring Controversy In The Courtroom

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