"The Soiling of Old Glory" was taken on April 5, 1976, during the Boston busing desegregation protests. Stanley Forman/Boston Herald American hide caption

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Life After Iconic 1976 Photo: The American Flag's Role In Racial Protest

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Susan Glisson, former director of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation at the University of Mississippi, facilitates discussions on slavery and race. Charles Tucker/Sustainable Equity hide caption

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'Only Cheap Talk Is Cheap': Mississippi Woman Hosts Conversations About Race

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Louisiana state Rep. Patricia Haynes Smith speaks during a rally at City Hall on Friday in Baton Rouge, La. The local NAACP is calling for a boycott of Walmart and two local shopping malls. Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Albert Raby (left) and Ralph Abernathy at City Hall in Chicago, in 1965. Courtesy of Bernard Kleina hide caption

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When King Came To Chicago: See The Rare Images Of His Campaign — In Color

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Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat touched off the Montgomery bus boycott and the beginning of the civil rights movement, is fingerprinted by police Lt. D.H. Lackey in Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 22, 1956, when she was among several others charged with violating segregation laws. Gene Herrick/AP hide caption

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In Montgomery, Rosa Parks' Story Offers A History Lesson For Police

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The courtroom in Sumner, Miss., where, in 1955, an all-white jury acquitted two white men in the murder of Emmett Till, a 14-year old black boy. Langdon Clay hide caption

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6 Decades Later, Acquittal Of Emmett Till's Killers Troubles Town

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Then NAACP Chairman Julian Bond addresses the civil rights organization's annual convention in Detroit in 2007. Bond, a civil rights activist and longtime board chairman of the NAACP, died Saturday, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. He was 75. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Rev. Channing E. Phillips, (left) Rabbi Arthur Waskow, and Topper Carew on April 4, 1969, the night of the first Freedom Seder. Courtesy of Arthur Waskow hide caption

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In Freedom Seder, Jews And African-Americans Built A Tradition Together

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In this Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015, photo, marchers hold up cellular phones to record the rapper Common and singer-songwriter John Legend performing at the foot of the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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The Racist History Behind The Iconic Selma Bridge

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Five members of the Friendship Nine — Willie Thomas Massey (from left), Willie McCleod, James Wells, Clarence Graham and David Williamson Jr. — sit at the counter of the Five & Dine restaurant in Rock Hill, S.C., on Dec. 17. A judge in South Carolina has thrown out the convictions of the nine black men who integrated a whites-only lunch counter in 1961. Jason Miczek/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Congressional staff members gather at the Capitol to raise awareness of the recent killings of black men by police officers, both of which did not result in grand jury indictments, on Dec. 11. They are joined by Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md. (second from left), and Senate Chaplain Barry Black (far right). J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee at the 1989 Cannes Festival for the showing of Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing. Courtesy of David Lee/All Rights Reserved hide caption

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Ruby Dee: An Actress Who Marched On Washington And Onto The Screen

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