Spain Spain

Wild horses graze at the Doñana National Park, in the Guadalquivir delta, in southern Spain. Last year, UNESCO threatened to put Doñana on its so-called 'Danger List' of World Heritage Sites where wildlife or conservation are at risk. Cristina Quicler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cristina Quicler/AFP/Getty Images

Drought Threatens Crops, Wildlife Along Spain's Guadalquivir River Delta

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President of the Catalan regional government Carles Puigdemont (center) announced a referendum for independence from Spain on Friday in Barcelona. Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images

Unsold cars, used and new, are unloaded from tractor-trailers into a parking lot south of Madrid. It's one of the biggest sales areas for used cars and scrap metal near the Spanish capital. Vendors say they're anticipating difficulty selling diesel cars, now that Madrid and other European capitals have announced plans to ban them. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

In Madrid, A Plan To Fight Pollution By Shifting Away From Diesel-Run Cars

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The limestone Rock of Gibraltar towers above the pensinsula, a British dependent territory that profits from tourism, finance and its shipyard. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Old posters on the wall of a school in San Cristóbal call on students to participate in a strike last November. The slogan warns, "Get out of the way, Francoists!" Spain's experience of decades of dictatorship helps protect against an embrace of the right wing now. Calling someone a franquista — a follower of the late, right-wing dictator Francisco Franco — remains an insult. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Unlike Elsewhere In Europe, The Far Right In Spain Stays On The Fringe

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Tourists take pictures in front of Barcelona's Sagrada Familia church. The city of 1.6 million gets more than 30 million tourists a year. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP

For Barcelona, Tourism Boom Comes At High Cost

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Ada Colau, center, celebrates after her election as Barcelona's mayor in 2015. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Emilio Morenatti/AP

For Barcelona Activist Turned Mayor, The Anti-Corruption Goals Stay The Same

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Spain's Princess Cristina and her husband, former Olympic handball player Inaki Urdangarin, leave the courtroom last year after a hearing in a landmark corruption trial on the Spanish Balearic island of Mallorca. Jaime Reina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jaime Reina/AFP/Getty Images

Volunteers serve free dinner to homeless people at Robin Hood restaurant in Madrid. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

Spain's 'Robin Hood Restaurant' Charges The Rich And Feeds The Poor

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