Cold War Cold War

Fallout shelter signs, like this one, still hang on buildings around the U.S. Travis S./Flickr hide caption

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Travis S./Flickr

As Rhetoric Ramps Up, Are Today's Kids Worried About Nuclear War?

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The Cheyenne Mountain Complex was completed in the mid-1960s. The tunnels extend thousands of feet into Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado Springs, Colo. Courtesy Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Courtesy Simon & Schuster

In The Event Of Attack, Here's How The Government Plans 'To Save Itself'

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A United Nations propaganda poster from the Korean War era bears an anti-communist message. In South Korea, the propaganda turned North Koreans into beast-like characters. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images

Why Do Some South Koreans Believe A Myth That North Koreans Have Horns?

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Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

This undated photo released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on Nov. 11 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un at a defense detachment on Mahap Islet. KNS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KNS/AFP/Getty Images

How Uncertainty In The Korean Peninsula Could Be A 'Recipe for Disaster'

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Pez Owen was joyriding in her Cessna airplane when she first spotted a giant X etched in the desert. "It's not on the [flight] chart. There just wasn't any indication of this huge cross," she says. Chuck Penson/Pez Owen hide caption

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Chuck Penson/Pez Owen

Decades-Old Mystery Put To Rest: Why Are There X's In The Desert?

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A tourist at the Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, New Mexico, in February examines a full-size replica of the "Fat Man" atomic bomb which was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on Aug. 9, 1945. Los Alamos is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory which was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Alexander/Getty Images

Nancy Reagan (left) and Soviet first lady Raisa Gorbachev both smile politely during a tension-filled tea in Geneva in 1985, while their husbands discussed nuclear disarmament. Dieter Endlicher/AP hide caption

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Dieter Endlicher/AP

Young South Koreans in the Hongdae neighborhood of Seoul, the weekend following North Korea's latest announcement of a nuclear test. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

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Haeryun Kang/for NPR

For Young South Koreans, The North's Nuclear Test Is Barely A Blip

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The SS United States ocean liner, seen here docked in Philadelphia in 2013, was built in 1952 for United States Lines in an attempt to capture the trans-Atlantic speed record. Landov hide caption

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Landov

Willis Conover, an expert on jazz, broadcasts "Music USA" from his Voice of America studio in Washington in March 1959. AP hide caption

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AP

Willis Conover, The Voice Of Jazz Behind The Iron Curtain

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Courtesy of Doubleday

From Blueprints To Betrayal: The Daring, And Downfall, Of A Cold War Spy

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel, left, and Mayor of Berlin Klaus Wowereit, 3rd from left, place candles to commemorate the victims of the Wall at the Berlin Wall memorial site at Bernauer Strasse in Berlin, Germany, on Sunday. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Swedish corvette HMS Stockholm patrols Jungfrufjarden in the Stockholm archipelago, Sweden, on Monday. Swedish authorities say they've detected "foreign underwater activity" thought to be a possible Russian submarine. Anders Wiklund/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Anders Wiklund/EPA/Landov