Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina cover streets on Aug. 30, 2005, in New Orleans. Vincent Laforet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Laforet/AFP/Getty Images

New Maps Label Much Of New Orleans Out Of Flood Hazard Area

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Workers unload bananas in New Orleans. Bananas Foster, one of New Orleans' favorite desserts, is a lasting legacy of an oft-forgotten chapter in the city's history: the banana trade, which spawned banana republics. Arnold Genthe/Library of Congress hide caption

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Arnold Genthe/Library of Congress

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick stands on the field during an NFL game against the Atlanta Falcons in Santa Clara, Calif. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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My Father Stood For The Anthem, For The Same Reason That Colin Kaepernick Sits

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Her income as a New Orleans singer fluctuates with the tourist season, says Lisa Lynn Kotnik, and that's made health insurance too expensive in the past. Now that she has a Medicaid card, getting the health care and medicine she needs should be easier. Courtesy of Skip Bolen hide caption

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Courtesy of Skip Bolen

Louisiana Medicaid Expansion Brings Insurance To Many New Orleans Musicians

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A view inside the UpStairs Lounge after the fire that killed 32 people on June 25, 1973. Many of the victims were there for a meeting of the Metropolitan Community Church, an LGBT-affirmative church founded by the Rev. Troy Perry. Jack Thornell/AP hide caption

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Jack Thornell/AP

Out Of Ashes, An Unwavering Resolve: 'That's The Legacy. We Never Ran Away'

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Jeff Hebert, who is leading New Orleans' efforts to adapt to rising sea levels, stands at the site of the future Mirabeau Water Garden, a federally funded project designed to absorb water in residential Gentilly. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Adapting To A More Extreme Climate, Coastal Cities Get Creative

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Sybil Morial has written a memoir about growing up in segregated New Orleans. /Courtesy John F. Blair hide caption

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/Courtesy John F. Blair

'Witness To Change' Recounts Civil Rights Struggles Of New Orleans

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Mardi Gras Spectators in Mobile, Ala., in 2010. Buyenlarge/Getty Images hide caption

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For Mardi Gras, Les Bon Temps Rouler In Mobile, Ala., Too

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Delvin Breaux, during a game against the New York Giants in November 2015. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

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Even A Broken Neck Couldn't Bury His Dream

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

'A Confederacy Of Dunces Cookbook': A Classic Revisited In Recipes

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Wendell Pierce is known for his roles on HBO's The Wire and Treme. Sean Hagwell/Courtesy of Riverhead Books hide caption

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Sean Hagwell/Courtesy of Riverhead Books

From 'Godot' To HBO, Wendell Pierce Says, Art Aided Post-Katrina Healing

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Palm trees bend and banners rip on Canal Street as Hurricane Katrina blows through New Orleans on Aug. 29, 2005 — 10 years ago Saturday. Ted Jackson/The Times-Picayune/Landov hide caption

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3 Views On A Tragedy: Reporters Recall First Days After Katrina

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Paul and Lakeya Mazant met in 2007, during Mardi Gras, as New Orleans was reeling from the flooding after Hurricane Katrina. The couple — pictured with their son Paul, 1, and daughter Logan, 5 — say they couldn't imagine falling in love with someone who hadn't experienced the storm. Walter Ray Watson/NPR hide caption

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A Decade After Flood's Devastation, Love Keeps New Orleans Afloat

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Water spills into New Orleans' Lower Ninth Ward through a failed floodwall along the Industrial Canal on Aug. 30, 2005, a day after Hurricane Katrina tore through the city Pool/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Billions Spent On Flood Barriers, But New Orleans Still A 'Fishbowl'

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Joel Munguia (center), owner of Chino's, a barbershop in Kenner, La., sits with his nephew, Waldyn Munguia (left), as they have a laugh outside on the waiting benches at the shop. Munguia came to New Orleans from Honduras in 2005 after Katrina and opened his dream shop for Latino hairstyles in 2012. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Some Moved On, Some Moved In And Made A New New Orleans

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