New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu's position against the enforcement of Trump's immigration policies could jeopardize some federal funding. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Louisiana Immigrant Rights Groups Organize Against Trump Policies

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On Tuesday, a tornado tore through New Orleans East, causing destruction to a neighborhood hit hard by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

After Tornado, Families In New Orleans Begin Rebuilding Once Again

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A neighborhood in the eastern part of New Orleans where a tornado touched down on Tuesday. Tornadoes destroyed homes and injured dozens of people in the city. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gardner/Getty Images

Sherrel Johnson, mother of 17-year-old James Brissette, who was killed by New Orleans police officers on the Danziger Bridge six days after Hurricane Katrina. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

People gather Sunday night for a vigil at Bourbon Street and Iberville Street for Demontris Toliver, 25, who was killed early Sunday morning in a shooting in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina cover streets on Aug. 30, 2005, in New Orleans. Vincent Laforet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Laforet/AFP/Getty Images

New Maps Label Much Of New Orleans Out Of Flood Hazard Area

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Workers unload bananas in New Orleans. Bananas Foster, one of New Orleans' favorite desserts, is a lasting legacy of an oft-forgotten chapter in the city's history: the banana trade, which spawned banana republics. Arnold Genthe/Library of Congress hide caption

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Arnold Genthe/Library of Congress

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick stands on the field during an NFL game against the Atlanta Falcons in Santa Clara, Calif. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

My Father Stood For The Anthem, For The Same Reason That Colin Kaepernick Sits

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Her income as a New Orleans singer fluctuates with the tourist season, says Lisa Lynn Kotnik, and that's made health insurance too expensive in the past. Now that she has a Medicaid card, getting the health care and medicine she needs should be easier. Courtesy of Skip Bolen hide caption

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Courtesy of Skip Bolen

Louisiana Medicaid Expansion Brings Insurance To Many New Orleans Musicians

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A view inside the UpStairs Lounge after the fire that killed 32 people on June 25, 1973. Many of the victims were there for a meeting of the Metropolitan Community Church, an LGBT-affirmative church founded by the Rev. Troy Perry. Jack Thornell/AP hide caption

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Jack Thornell/AP

Out Of Ashes, An Unwavering Resolve: 'That's The Legacy. We Never Ran Away'

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Jeff Hebert, who is leading New Orleans' efforts to adapt to rising sea levels, stands at the site of the future Mirabeau Water Garden, a federally funded project designed to absorb water in residential Gentilly. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Tegan Wendland/WWNO

Adapting To A More Extreme Climate, Coastal Cities Get Creative

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Sybil Morial has written a memoir about growing up in segregated New Orleans. /Courtesy John F. Blair hide caption

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/Courtesy John F. Blair

'Witness To Change' Recounts Civil Rights Struggles Of New Orleans

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