As Indiana Governor, Mike Pence announced in 2015 that the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services approved a waiver for the state's Medicaid experiment. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

It's been a few weeks since President-elect Donald Trump celebrated Indiana's Carrier company's decision to keep some factory jobs from moving to Mexico. Other manufacturers are wondering what the deal might mean for them. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Carrier Got Cut A Deal, But Can Other Companies Expect The Same?

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Kara Salim, 26, got out of the Marion County, Indiana, jail in 2015 with a history of domestic-violence charges, bipolar disorder and alcoholism — and without Medicaid coverage. As a result, she couldn't afford the fees for court-ordered therapy. Philip Scott Andrews for KHN hide caption

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Philip Scott Andrews for KHN

Signed Out Of Prison But Not Signed Up For Health Insurance

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President-elect Donald Trump speaks at Carrier Corp. on Thursday, in Indianapolis. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Is Trump's Deal With Carrier A Form Of Crony Capitalism?

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In 2015, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence announced that the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services had approved the state's waiver to try a different approach for Medicaid. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Vendors congregated outside a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Indiana Theater on May 1, 2016 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Charles Ledford/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Ledford/Getty Images

This Bellwether Has Picked The Winning Presidential Candidate Since The 1890s

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(Left to right) Executive Councilor Chris Sununu, Republican gubernatorial hopeful Lt. Gov. Phil Scott, and Indiana Lt. Gov. Eric Holcomb. Jim Cole, Wilson Ring, AJ Mast/AP hide caption

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Jim Cole, Wilson Ring, AJ Mast/AP

Teacher Sarah Ross and students (from left to right) Ximena, age 4, Yareli, age 3, and Kendra, age 2 at the Indiana Migrant Preschool Center, a free preschool for migrant children ages 2 to 5. The school teaches students in English and Spanish with the goal of preparing migrant children for kindergarten, wherever it may be. Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Schools Hustle To Reach Kids Who Move With The Harvest, Not The School Year

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Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., seen here in 2012, are both facing competitive elections in 2016. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

How To Lose The Senate In 82 Days

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A Planned Parenthood clinic in Florida. The organization filed the lawsuits that led to injuctions in Florida and Indiana. Michele Sandberg/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Sandberg/Corbis via Getty Images

Republican Ted Cruz makes a campaign stop at the Bravo Cafe Monday in Osceola, Ind. The Hoosier State might be Cruz's last chance to stop Donald Trump from getting the nomination. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

An engine is assembled at a Cummins plant in Columbus, Ind., in 2007. The Fortune 500 company sells diesel engines around the world. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

As Factory Jobs Slip Away, Indiana Voters Have Trade On Their Minds

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Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during a press conference March 31, 2015, at the Indiana State Library in Indianapolis. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Opana pills, seen in 2010, before Endo Pharmaceuticals changed the formula in a move intended to deter abuse. Tom Walker/Flickr hide caption

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Tom Walker/Flickr

How A Painkiller Designed To Deter Abuse Helped Spark An HIV Outbreak

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"Everyone that's in there right now has probably done it," Clyde Polly says about Opana injections at his home. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Inside A Small Brick House At The Heart Of Indiana's Opioid Crisis

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The iconic Coca-Cola bottle was actually modeled after a cocoa pod — even though it isn't an ingredient in the soda — by a glass company in Indiana. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

From Grocery Shelves To Pop Culture: A Century of Coca-Cola Bottles

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