The Alamo Drafthouse theater chain will show The Interview starting on Christmas Day. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A poster for The Interview. Some theaters now say they will show the comedy, which Sony Pictures had pulled following threats. Jim Ruymen/UPI /Landov hide caption

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Sony Pictures CEO Michael Lynton says the computer hacking against his company is "the worst cyberattack in U.S. history." Experts say other attacks have affected more people. David McNew/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Workers remove a poster for The Interview from a billboard in Hollywood, Calif., after Sony canceled the movie's Christmas release due to a terrorist threat. The hacking of Sony's networks has sparked a war of words between the U.S. and North Korea. ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sony Pictures Studios headquarters building is seen in Culver City, Calif., on Friday. President Obama has criticized Sony for cancelling distribution of The Interview following after the studio was hacked by North Korea. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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A banner for The Interview is posted outside Arclight Cinemas, in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles on Wednesday. The theatrical release of the film has been cancelled following cyber attacks and threats believed to originate in North Korea. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Sony Pictures was forced to cancel the release of its film The Interview this week after the hacking group, Guardians of Peace, threatened theaters that planned to screen the movie. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. intelligence officials believe North Korea was centrally involved in the recent attack on Sony Pictures' computer network — possibly out of retribution for its film The Interview. Above, a security guard stands outside a theater during the film's premiere in Los Angeles last week. Kevork Djansezian/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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James Franco (left) and Seth Rogen in The Interview. The North Korean dictator promised "merciless counter-measures" if this film was released. Ed Araquel/AP hide caption

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He's one of a kind: North Koreans cannot name their children Jong Un, and those who already share Kim Jong Un's name must change it, according to a newly confirmed directive from the country's government. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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