Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un seen here in a May 2001 file photo, was alleged assassinated at the Kuala Lumpur airport last week. Shizuo Kambayashi/AP hide caption

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Shizuo Kambayashi/AP

China Monitors Assassination Probe Of North Korean Kim Jong Nam

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TV screens in Seoul, South Korea, show images Wednesday of Kim Jong Nam, the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. On Tuesday, Kim Jong Nam was killed in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Third Suspect In Custody After Mysterious Death Of Kim Jong Un's Half-Brother

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Kim Jong Nam, eldest son of North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, in Beijing in 2007. He died Monday, according to South Korean intelligence. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

N. Korean Leader Kim Jong Un's Half-Brother Is Dead. But Why?

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Kim Jong Nam, the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and the eldest son of former leader Kim Jong Il, waves to reporters on the Chinese island of Macau in 2010. Shin In-seop/AP hide caption

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Shin In-seop/AP

North Korean soldiers in a mass military parade at Kim Il-Sung square in Pyongyang on Oct. 10, 2015. North Korea conducted its first missile test of the year Sunday morning. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

North Korea Test-Fires First Missile During Trump's Presidency

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Former North Korean deputy ambassador to London Thae Yong Ho speaks during a briefing on Wednesday in Seoul. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

North Korean Defector: Information Flow Will Help Bring Down Kim Jong Un

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Workers in Seoul's Yongsan ward office wait in a parking garage for an all-clear sign during a recent air raid drill. Concerned about a possible attack by North Korea, the South Koreans hold the drills twice a year. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

In S. Korea, Air Raid Drills Are A Reminder Of N. Korean Threat

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un looks at a warhead component being developed for a ballistic missile, at an unidentified location in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency on March 15, 2016. KCNA/Reuters hide caption

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KCNA/Reuters

Mount Paektu, which sits on the border with China, is known in North Korea as the "sacred mountain of revolution" and considered the legendary birthplace of Kim Jong Il and Korean culture. David Guttenfelder/AP hide caption

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David Guttenfelder/AP

North Korean Volcano Provides Rare Chance For Scientific Collaboration

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A statue of Mozambique's first president, Samora Machel, at a city square in the capital Maputo. The monument is one of many similar statues built throughout Africa by North Korean workers. The United Nations on Wednesday banned the export of North Korean monuments, saying the government was earning hard currency that could be used to advance its nuclear program. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

This undated photo released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on Nov. 11 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un at a defense detachment on Mahap Islet. KNS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KNS/AFP/Getty Images

How Uncertainty In The Korean Peninsula Could Be A 'Recipe for Disaster'

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This undated picture released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on Aug. 4 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un delivering a speech at the April 25 House of Culture in Pyongyang. KCNA Via KNS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KCNA Via KNS/AFP/Getty Images

Then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and North Korean leader Kim Jong Il toast in Pyongyang on Oct. 24, 2000. The U.S. and North Korea signed an agreement six years earlier to curb North Korea's nuclear activities in exchange for aid, but it collapsed in 2002, during the Bush administration. Chien-Min Chung/AP hide caption

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Chien-Min Chung/AP

Will Iran Deal Meet The Same Fate As A Past U.S.-North Korean Arms Deal?

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