The U.S. and South Korea kicked off annual military exercises Monday, prompting threats of a nuclear strike from North Korea amid high tensions on the peninsula. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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The eighth and ninth graders at a recent Unification Leader Camp in Jeju, South Korea, answer questions about their knowledge of their neighbors to the North. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Yes, There's A Summer Camp Dedicated To Learning About North Korea

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People walk past a TV screen showing a poster of Sony Picture's "The Interview" in a news report, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The FBI says North Korea hacked into Sony Pictures computer systems as retribution for the film. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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A North Korean man reads a local newspaper on Sunday with an image of leader Kim Jong Un. Kim said during a critical ruling party congress that his country will not use its nuclear weapons first unless its sovereignty is invaded, state media reported. Kim Kwan Hyon/AP hide caption

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N. Korea Wants Economic And Nuclear Expansion, But One Undercuts The Other

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North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un reporting works of North Korean Workers Party Central Committee during the second-day of the 7th Workers Party Congress in Pyongyang. KCNA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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This photo dated April 1977 shows Megumi Yokota, who was kidnapped by North Korean agents later the same year. Megumi was one of eight Japanese nationals who Pyongyang confirmed were dead in 2002. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il apologized for the kidnapping at an historic meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Relatives Of Japanese Taken By North Korea Still Hope To Find Loved Ones

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A man in South Korea watches a news broadcast Friday showing file footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un. Speaking at a major gathering in North Korea, Kim declared "great success" in the country's recent nuclear test and a rocket launch. JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In A Major Speech, Kim Jong Un Trumpets 'Great Success' With Nukes

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This undated picture released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (C) inspecting a catfish farm at an undisclosed location in North Korea. KNS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joking About A North Korean Cooking Show Just Isn't Funny

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Shin Eun-mi was deported by immigration authorities in South Korea following an investigation that she broke the National Security Act. Shin Joon-hee/AP via Yonhap hide caption

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The North Korea Threat Keeps A Cold-War Era Security Law Around

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