In this image released by North Korea's Central News Agency, leader Kim Jong Un is said to be using a pair of binoculars to look south during an inspection of a front-line army unit. /Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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From 'Morning Edition': Louisa Lim reports
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South Korea's Park Geun-hye claimed victory Wednesday in the country's presidential election. Park, the daughter of a former military dictator, will be the first female leader of the country. Here, she greets supporters at party headquarters. Kim Jae-hwan/AP hide caption

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In Seoul today: South Koreans watch a television broadcast about the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Linda Wertheimer talks with Stephen Bosworth
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This still image taken from video shows lawmaker Kim Sun-Dong (bottom) of the Democratic Labor Party detonating a tear gas canister and throwing it toward the chairman's seat at the National Assembly. Yonhap/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The law firm handling a new suit seeking damages for Apple's location tracking gathered plaintiffs at a website called"sue apple," seen here in a screengrab. sueapple.co.kr hide caption

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Bill Richardson on North Korean rhetoric
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