South Korea South Korea

The U.S. Navy says the USS Michigan, a guided missile submarine, has docked in South Korea on a "routine visit." It is shown here in 2014 west of Manila, Philippines. Jun Dumaguing/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jun Dumaguing/AP

Ousted South Korean President Park Geun-hye arrives at the Seoul Central District Court for a hearing in late March. Arrested shortly after that hearing, Park has now been formally indicted on corruption charges. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

Vice President Pence arrived Monday at the South Korean border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lee Jin-man/AP

A United Nations propaganda poster from the Korean War era bears an anti-communist message. In South Korea, the propaganda turned North Koreans into beast-like characters. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
-/AFP/Getty Images

Why Do Some South Koreans Believe A Myth That North Koreans Have Horns?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521742040/522554700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The ferry Sewol sits on a semi-submersible transport vessel during the salvage operation in waters off the island of Jindo on Sunday. On Tuesday, South Korean officials said remains believed to be from some of the missing victims were recovered by salvage workers. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Workers attempt to salvage the sunken Sewol ferry in waters off the island of Jindo, South Korea. The Sewol sank in April 2014, killing more than 300 people. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

"The policy of strategic patience has ended," Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (left) said Friday of dealing with North Korea. Tillerson is visiting South Korea; he's seen here alongside South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se in Seoul. Jung Yeon-Je/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jung Yeon-Je/AP

The U.S. has begun deploying the Terminal High Altitude Aerial Defense - THAAD - an anti-missile system meant to defend South Korea against attacks from the North. The first components arrived in South Korea last week. U.S. Forces Korea hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Forces Korea

A Long List Of Challenges Awaits Rex Tillerson In Asia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520212290/520223267" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Korean peninsula analyst Robert E. Kelly earned widespread empathy after his kids provided an expected spot of comic relief in a live appearance on the BBC on Friday. BBC News Cards Against Humanity via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
BBC News Cards Against Humanity via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Ousted South Korea's former President Park Geun-hye, center, arrives at her private home in Seoul, South Korea, on Sunday. She vacated the presidential palace and returned to her home two days after the Constitutional Court removed her from office. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

Korean peninsula analyst Robert E. Kelly earned widespread empathy after his kids provided an expected spot of comic relief in a live appearance on the BBC on Friday. BBC News Cards Against Humanity via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
BBC News Cards Against Humanity via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

A supporter cries during a rally opposing President Park Geun-hye's impeachment near the Constitutional Court in Seoul, South Korea, on Friday. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

South Korean President's Impeachment Triggers Clashes And Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519597783/519703400" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Supporters of South Korean President Park Geun-hye stage a rally opposing her impeachment near the Constitutional Court in Seoul on Friday. People gathered ahead of the court ruling on whether Park would be removed from office over a corruption scandal. The sign reads "South Korean President Park Geun-hye." Recent polling showed a 3-1 margin in favor of impeachment. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

South Korean Judges Uphold President Park Geun-hye's Impeachment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519547627/519593275" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript