South Korea South Korea

In this photo from 2014, passengers walk past the Middle East respiratory syndrome quarantine area at Manila's International Airport in the Phillipines. The virus is now raising public concern in South Korea. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron Favila/AP

Gloria Steinem and South Korean peace activists march along a military fence at a checkpoint after crossing the border separating North and South Korea. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Controversy Follows As Activists Cross North-South Korean Border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/409192045/409309306" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hold a joint news conference following meetings at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Seoul. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

In Seoul, Kerry Calls N. Korea Provocations 'Egregious,' 'Reckless'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/407611888/407619712" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Sunday, about 70 marchers gathered at Seoul's City Hall Square to raise attention for South Korea's single moms. The annual event is in its fifth year. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

South Korea's Single Moms Struggle To Remove A Social Stigma

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/405622494/405816974" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The General (right) and his opponent, Dragon, lock horns during this year's Cheongdo Bullfighting Festival in South Korea. There are no matadors and no swords in the South Korean version. The bulls fight until one turns and runs. Marius Stankiewicz for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Marius Stankiewicz for NPR

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Boston on Monday. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

The Past Haunts The Present For Japan's Shinzo Abe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/402480866/402736068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People pay tribute at a group memorial altar for victims of the sunken South Korean ferry Sewol at a remembrance hall in Ansan on Thursday. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

South Korean President Promises To Raise Sewol Ferry, One Year After Tragedy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/400064018/400064720" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Relatives of victims of the Sewol ferry accident stand before a banner featuring victim photos during a protest. More than 300 people, most of them high school students, died in the accident. Nine people remain missing. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

A Year After Ferry Disaster, South Koreans Await Answers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/398214127/399944792" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students take the annual College Scholastic Ability Test, or college entrance exam, at a high school in Seoul last November. Students face enormous pressure to do well on the test and get into a top university. Airplanes are grounded on the day of the test so they won't disturb the students. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

The All-Work, No-Play Culture Of South Korean Education

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/393939759/399751530" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Koreans — many of them elderly — line up to receive 500 won, or about 50 cents, from Shin Banpo Church in southern Seoul. Each week, organizers say, a few hundred seniors show up at each church that offers the service, and the line starts hours in advance. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

A Forgotten Generation: Half Of South Korea's Elderly Live In Poverty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/398498496/398824627" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rachel Ahn, who goes by "Aebong-ee," is among the top 100 most-watched mukbang stars in South Korea. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

Koreans Have An Insatiable Appetite For Watching Strangers Binge Eat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/392430233/395001653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Language instructor Soh Bor-am teaches eight Mandarin classes a day, as Chinese tourism to South Korea swells. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

A Chinese Tourism Boom Has South Koreans Cramming

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/393752309/394146389" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert waves as he leaves a hospital in Seoul, where he recovered from being attacked by a knife-wielding South Korean nationalist. Kyodo /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Kyodo /Landov