South Korea South Korea

Armed South Korean soldiers cross a bridge on a truck in the border town of Paju, South Korea, on Sunday, as negotiators from the South and North Korea resumed talks. EPA/Landov hide caption

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EPA/Landov

An undated composite photograph showing the delegates at the Panmunjom talks on Saturday. (Left to right) South Korean National Security Adviser Kim Kwan-jin, South Korean Unification Minister Hong Yong-pyo, Hwang Pyong-so, the North Korean military's top political officer and Kim Yang-gon, the top North Korean official in charge of inter-Korean affairs. EPA/Landov hide caption

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EPA/Landov

A shop at Seoul's Namdaemun's market where electric fans are sold. Despite scientists who tell them it's safe, many older South Koreans believe that it's dangerous to go to sleep with an electric fan on and never do so. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

South Korea's Quirky Notions About Electric Fans

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Visitors look at a miniature map of the Korean Peninsula at the Odusan observatory in Paju, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, on Friday. North Korea is set to push back its clocks by half an hour to mark the end of Japanese occupation after World War II. Jeon Heon-Kyun/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Jeon Heon-Kyun/EPA/Landov

A stage production or a Korean wedding? It can be hard to tell. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Need Fake Friends For Your Wedding? In S. Korea, You Can Hire Them

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Not only did the family trade their urban life for one in a beautiful valley surrounded by mountains and trees, but they also earn $300,000 a year. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

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Traditional architecture and modern skyscrapers overlap in central Seoul. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

In Seoul, Where Everything Moves Fast, There's Also Longing For The Past

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Iced tea made from local berries is served with melon and squares of sweet sticky rice topped with fruits and nuts. The nuns eat these sweets on head-shaving day, to replenish their energy. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Buddhist Diet For A Clear Mind: Nuns Preserve Art Of Korean Temple Food

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A typical midhike feast once hikers reach their destination. HaeRyun Kang/NPR hide caption

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HaeRyun Kang/NPR

Keeping Alive The Korean Love For Hiking, Thousands Of Miles From Korea

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A religious activist is carried away by police after he tried to stop a gay pride parade in Seoul last year. Christian activists are planning to disrupt the parade again this year. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

A Showdown Looms At South Korea's Gay Pride Parade

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South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se (left) speaks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at their meeting in Tokyo. The two countries are marking the 50th anniversary of establishing relations. While leaders in both countries stressed the importance of the ties, a bitter history continues to strain the relationship. Issei Kato/AP hide caption

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Issei Kato/AP

Best Frenemies: Japan, Korea Mark 50th Anniversary Despite Rivalry

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