People watch a TV news program showing a file image of a previous missile launch conducted by North Korea at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul. North Korea on Sunday test-launched a ballistic missile that landed in the Sea of Japan, the South Korean, Japanese and U.S. militaries said. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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South Korean presidential candidate Moon Jae-in of the Democratic Party of Korea reacts to exit polls suggesting his victory, in the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, on Tuesday. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Liberal Wins South Korean Presidency As Opponents Concede

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South Korean presidential candidate Moon Jae-in of the Democratic Party campaigns in Goyang, South Korea, on May 4. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

Leading South Korean Presidential Candidate Moon Aims To Negotiate With North

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Protest banners hang in rural Seongju county, where the U.S. has installed a missile defense system known by its acronym, THAAD. Residents oppose the installation, and it's become an issue in South Korea's upcoming presidential election. The front-runner says he wants to rethink the U.S. deal. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Korean Village's Message To THAAD Missile Defense System: 'Go Away'

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Amateur K-pop dancers perform at a presidential campaign rally for Moon Jae-in, the candidate for Korea's Democratic Party, in Seoul on Saturday. Courtesy of Moon Jae-in Campaign hide caption

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Courtesy of Moon Jae-in Campaign

Parade Floats And Altered K-Pop Songs Mark South Korea's Coming Election

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A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense missile interceptor system is now functional at its South Korean site. In this photo from 2013, one of the THAAD systems is seen performing a test launch. Ralph Scott/U.S. Department of Defense hide caption

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Ralph Scott/U.S. Department of Defense

Lee Seung-won, 74, considers himself a pro-U.S. conservative, and he believes the ousted South Korean president, Park Geun-hye, was unfairly treated. Park goes on trial Tuesday for corruption. An election to replace her will be held May 9. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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In South Korea's Presidential Election, A Referendum On U.S. Relations

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The U.S. Navy says the USS Michigan, a guided missile submarine, has docked in South Korea on a "routine visit." It is shown here in 2014 west of Manila, Philippines. Jun Dumaguing/AP hide caption

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Ousted South Korean President Park Geun-hye arrives at the Seoul Central District Court for a hearing in late March. Arrested shortly after that hearing, Park has now been formally indicted on corruption charges. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Vice President Pence arrived Monday at the South Korean border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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A United Nations propaganda poster from the Korean War era bears an anti-communist message. In South Korea, the propaganda turned North Koreans into beast-like characters. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Do Some South Koreans Believe A Myth That North Koreans Have Horns?

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