Amazon recently premiered its new dramedy Transparent. The massive retailer is banking on its original TV content to rope in new customers. Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Amazon Studios hide caption

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Amazon's Original Content Primes The Pump For Bigger Sales

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos introduces the new Amazon Fire phone June 18 in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Is Amazon's Failed Phone A Cautionary Tale?

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos wants to sell all e-books for $9.99, while the publisher Hachette wants to vary the prices. iStockphoto hide caption

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In E-Book Price War, Amazon's Long-Term Strategy Requires Short-Term Risks

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Nancy Becker, an Amazon employee in Bad Hersfeld, Germany, speaks at a protest rally outside the company's headquarters in Seattle in December. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Amazon's German Workers Push For Higher Wages, Union Contract

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The cover of Michael Bunker's self published book Pennsylvania Omnibus. Michael Bunker hide caption

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Self-Published Authors Make A Living — And Sometimes A Fortune

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Brazilian chef Alex Atala, whose restaurant, D.O.M., is ranked among the top 10 in the world, was named one of the most influential people by Time magazine this year. Cassio Vasconcellos/AP hide caption

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Amazon Locavore: Meet The Man Putting Brazilian Food On The Map

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