Hemingway left his books, papers and typewriter (seen here in 1964) in Cuba when he returned to America. Mondadori Portfolio /Getty Images hide caption

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New Conservation Effort Aims To Protect Papa's Papers

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French chef Auguste Escoffier, seen here at a cafe in 1921, helped to found the Ritz Hotel, where Ernest Hemingway was a longtime regular. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernest Hemingway revises For Whom The Bell Tolls, in Sun Valley, Idaho, in November 1940. Robert Capa/International Center of Photography/Magnum Photos hide caption

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Exhibition Delves Below Deceptively Simple Surface Of Hemingway's Prose

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"Hairy Truman," one of the six-toed cats at the Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum in Key West, Fla. Rob O'Neal/Florida Keys News Bureau/AP hide caption

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The Feds Can Tell Ernest Hemingway's Cats What To Do; Here's Why

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