A photo of the truck that hit and shifted the train tracks, causing an Amtrak derailment in Kansas. National Transportation Safety Board via Twitter hide caption

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Rabbi Daniel Rockoff of Orthodox Congregation Beth Israel Abraham Voliner estimates there about 250 Sabbath-observant families in Johnson County, Kan. Elle Moxley/KCUR hide caption

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When A Saturday Caucus Means No Voting For Orthodox Jews

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Elizabeth Shirley's lawsuit, which resulted in a settlement for $132,000, could send a message to gun dealers across the country. But for now, the precedent will only have weight in Kansas. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Kansas Lawsuit Settlement Sets Standard For Gun Seller Liability

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Several states are considering measures restricting how welfare benefits can be used. In Kansas, a bill on the governor's desk will bar recipients from spending their benefits on movies, swimming or casinos, or from withdrawing more than $25 per day from ATMs. Brownie Harris/Corbis hide caption

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On Welfare? Don't Use The Money For Movies, Say Kansas Lawmakers

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Corrections officer Sgt. Charles Galaviz secures an inmate for transfer with handcuffs and shackles Jan. 24 at the Lexington Assessment and Reception Center, in Lexington, Okla. Overtime is mandatory for correctional officers in the state's prisons, which have a manpower shortage of about 33 percent and the highest inmate homicide rate in the country. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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States Face Correctional Officer Shortage Amid A Cultural Stigma

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