A woman in Buenos Aires walks with her dog past a mural that reads "Vultures" in Spanish. The mural is a reference to the dispute between the Argentine government and U.S. hedge funds. Victor R. Caivano/AP hide caption

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Argentina Crisis Puts Focus On Role Of Distressed-Debt Funds

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Pope Francis celebrates a Mass of reconciliation in Seoul's main cathedral on Monday. The wife and children of Francis' nephew have died after a car accident in Argentina, the Vatican reports. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Estela de Carlotto (center), head of the Argentine human rights organization that seeks to reunite babies stolen decades ago with their biological relatives, announced on Monday she had located her 36-year-old grandson. Martin Zabala/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Grandmother Finds Grandson, Abducted In Argentina's Dirty War

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Supermarket employees try to recover items left by looters in San Miguel de Tucuman, Argentina, on Monday. Looting has spread across Argentina as mobs take advantage of strikes by police demanding pay raises to match inflation. Bruno Cerimele/AP hide caption

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Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner will undergo surgery to relieve a hematoma on her brain Tuesday. She is seen here last month, at the U.N. General Assembly. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Temperatures have reached record highs in Buenos Aires this week. Here, the city's market of Plaza Dorrego in San Telmo is seen on Sunday. Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Coca-Cola Life, a new product being rolled out in Argentina with a green label, is being marketed as a "natural" and therefore lower-calorie cola. Coca-Cola hide caption

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In Argentina, Coca-Cola Tests Market For 'Green' Coke

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Former dictator and Gen. Jorge Rafael Videla (left), and former general and member of the military junta Reynaldo Bignone in a Buenos Aires court on Thursday. Juan Mabromata /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The European Union is forcing a British winery to give away wine made with Argentinian Malbec grapes. Here, a cluster of Malbec grapes hang from a vine. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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