President Obama speaks at a joint news conference with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tokyo on Thursday. Obama reinforced the U.S.-Japan security commitment. Junko Kimura-Matsumoto/AP hide caption

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President Obama shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe before a private dinner at Sukiyabashi Jiro in Tokyo on Wednesday. At Sukiyabashi Jiro, people pay a minimum of $300 for 20 pieces of sushi chosen by the patron, Jiro Ono. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks to reporters after inspecting a maglev train system at the Yamanashi Experiment Center in Tsuru Saturday. Japan is reportedly willing to send the technology to the U.S. without a fee. Kazuhiro Nogi/AP hide caption

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Packs of whale meat are seen in a specialty store in Tokyo last week. An international court ruled Monday that Japan must stop issuing permits to hunt whales in the Antarctic. Shizuo Kambayashi/AP hide caption

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Horace Wilson and other members of his family in a portrait believed to date to the 1860s. He's the mustachioed fellow standing at top right. Courtesy of Abigail Sanborn hide caption

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Japanese Baseball Began On My Family's Farm In Maine

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Iwao Hakamada before he went to prison in 1966 and after his release on Thursday. Now 78, he was sentenced to death in 1968 for the murders of four people and may have been the world's longest-serving death row inmate. Newly analyzed DNA evidence indicates he may be innocent. A retrial has been ordered. Kyodo/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Courtesy Freer Gallery of Art

Japanese Tea Ritual Turned 15th Century 'Tupperware' Into Art

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Delegates from China's People's Liberation Army (PLA) march from Tiananmen Square to the Great Hall of the People to attend sessions of National People's Congress and Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference Tuesday in Beijing. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Japan's draft of a new energy proposal calls for opening nuclear power plants that were shut down after the nuclear disaster in 2011. Greg Webb/IAEA/AP hide caption

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Idle No More: Japan Plans To Restart Closed Nuclear Reactors

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A ceremony is held to mark a new patrol vessel in service for China's marine surveillance in Zhoushan, east China's Zhejiang Province, last month. Shen Lei/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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