Life Life

New NASA evidence suggests that there's a chemical reaction taking place under the moon's icy surface that could provide conditions for life. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
Luciano Lozano/Getty Images

A Brighter Outlook Could Translate To A Longer Life

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Proxima Centauri lies in the constellation of Centaurus (The Centaur), just over four light-years from Earth. Although it looks bright through the eye of Hubble, Proxima Centauri is not visible to the naked eye. ESA/Hubble & NASA hide caption

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ESA/Hubble & NASA

When the Galileo spacecraft swooped by Jupiter's frozen moon Europa in Nov. 1997, views of its blistered surface strengthened suspicions that a briny ocean harboring life could lie beneath an icy crust. AP hide caption

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AP