Actor Vin Diesel drives a vintage American car next to actress Michelle Rodriguez while shooting the latest installment of the Fast and Furious movie franchise in Havana, Cuba on April 28. Fast and Furious 8 is the second U.S. movie, and the first big-budget Hollywood film, to be shot in Havana since relations began improving between the two countries. Fernando Medina/AP hide caption

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Hollywood Rediscovers Cuba: Is It Too Soon To Call It Havanawood?

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Cuban President Raúl Castro (left), Commander of the Revolution Ramiro Valdés (center) and Cuban Vice President Miguel Díaz-Canel sit side by side at the Artemisa Mausoleum monument in July 2014. Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alcides Escobar #2 of the Kansas City Royals scores a run in the fifth inning against the New York Mets in Game Two of the 2015 World Series. Jamie Squire/Getty Images hide caption

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Changes In Safety And Diplomacy Are On Deck For Baseball's Opening Day

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President Obama arrives at the podium to address the Cuban people at the National Theater in Havana on Tuesday. He said the two countries should let go of the past and benefit from better relations in the future. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Cuban prima ballerina assoluta and choreographer Alicia Alonso acknowledges applause as she enters the theater that bears her name, before the arrival of President Obama at the Gran Teatro de la Havana. Mastrafoto/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama delivers a speech at the Grand Theater of Havana in Cuba on Tuesday. Obama said he came to Cuba to "bury the last remnant of the Cold War in the Americas." Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Listen to Morning Edition's special coverage

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Cuban President Raúl Castro lifts up President Obama's arm at the conclusion of Monday's joint news conference at the Palace of the Revolution in Havana. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Crew members of the U.S. Navy destroyer USS Jason Dunham load supplies while docked in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in 2015. The U.S. and Cuba have restored diplomatic relations, but the U.S. says it remains committed to keeping the base. David Welna/NPR hide caption

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Obama's Cuba Visit Raises The Question Of Guantanamo Bay's Future

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Alejandro Gonzalez Raga and his wife, Bertha Bueno Fuentes, visit the U.N. Council of Human Rights in Geneva in 2013. After Gonzalez was imprisoned in Cuba for five years, the Catholic Church and Spanish government helped negotiate his release, into exile in Spain. His wife and children were allowed to accompany him, and the family currently has refugee status in Spain. Courtesy of Alejandro Gonzalez Raga hide caption

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Pressing For Change In Cuba, From Exile In Spain

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U.S. President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama arrive at Jose Marti International Airport on Airforce One for a 48-hour visit on March 20, 2016 in Havana, Cuba. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Tourists walk next to a poster of Cuban President Raul Castro and President Obama ahead of the U.S. leader's visit. Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After Reaching Out His Hand, President Obama Will Step Foot In Cuba

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Lorna Burdsall with Fidel Castro in Havana, 1983. Courtesy of Gabriela Burdsall hide caption

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Stranger Than Fiction: Cuba, Spies, Bombs And Dance

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Los Angeles Dodgers star Yasiel Puig shakes hands with fans Dec. 16 at the Latin American Stadium in Havana during a Major League Baseball goodwill tour. Puig and fellow Cuban national Jose Abreu of the Chicago White Sox returned home Tuesday for the first time since defecting — Puig in 2012, Abreu in 2013 — to join the American big leagues. Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MLB Hopes New Openness Will Ease Players' Path From Cuba To The Majors

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