Cuba Cuba

Captives separated by a fence conduct communal evening prayers at the Camp 6 prison building at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Walter Michot/Miami Herald/TNS/Landov hide caption

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Walter Michot/Miami Herald/TNS/Landov

New Gitmo Plan Would Relocate Some Detainees To U.S.

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A supporter waves a Cuban flag in front of the country's embassy after it reopened for the first time in 54 years on July 20 in Washington, D.C. The embassy was closed in 1961 when U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower severed diplomatic ties with the island nation after Fidel Castro took power in a communist revolution. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Cubans gather in Santiago de Cuba to celebrate this year's Revolution Day, the 62nd anniversary of Fidel Castro's first open assault on the forces of President Fulgencio Batista, who would eventually be overthrown by the rebels. Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images

A Day Of Triumph In A Time Of Change: Cuba's High Holiday Explained

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American tourists, like these visitors taking a guided tour in May, still have to provide one of 12 authorized reasons — such as visiting family or engaging in humanitarian work — for travel to Cuba. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Desmond Boylan/AP

U.S.-Cuba Ties Are Restored, But Most American Tourists Will Have To Wait

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Secretary of State John Kerry spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep at the State Department. Kerry said if Congress or a future president reverses a nuclear control agreement with Iran, U.S. credibility will suffer. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

U.S. Will Lose 'All Credibility' If Congress Rejects Nuclear Deal, Kerry Says

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Carnival Expects to Begin Cruising To Cuba Next Year

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Federal agents seized Elián González, held in a closet by Donato Dalrymple, in Miami in April 2000. Dalrymple rescued the boy from the ocean after his mother drowned when they tried to escape Cuba. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

Miami swimwear entrepreneur Mel Valenzuela (right) explains online strategies to Cuban business owners Victor Rodriguez (middle) and Caridad Limonta (left) in Wynwood this month. Miami boutique owner Monica Minagorri (rear) watches. Tim Padgett/WLRN hide caption

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Tim Padgett/WLRN

Elian Gonzalez attends the closing ceremony of the legislative session at the National Assembly in Havana on Dec. 20, 2014. Gonzalez tells ABC News that he would like to visit the U.S. as a tourist. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP