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An artist's rendering of the newly named Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory hide caption

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Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

NASA Plans To Launch A Probe Next Year To 'Touch The Sun'

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This image shows Jupiter's south pole, as seen by NASA's Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles. The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles in diameter. NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles

Juno Spacecraft Reveals Spectacular Cyclones At Jupiter's Poles

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

Total Failure: When The Space Shuttle Didn't Come Home

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This composite of 30 images of asteroid 2014 JO25 was generated with radar data collected using NASA's Goldstone Solar System Radar in California's Mojave Desert. NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSSR hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSSR

The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, with the Orbital ATK Cygnus pressurized cargo module, stands ready for launch on the pad at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. United Launch Alliance hide caption

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United Launch Alliance

New NASA evidence suggests that there's a chemical reaction taking place under the moon's icy surface that could provide conditions for life. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

An artist's impression of a white dwarf in an extremely close orbit around what's believed to be a black hole. The star is so close that much of its material is being pulled away. X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss hide caption

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X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

That's no ravioli! Pan, one of Saturn's moons, bears more than a passing resemblance to a certain stuffed pasta. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

An image of Western Hemisphere lightning storms, captured Feb. 14 over the course of one hour. Brighter colors indicate more lightning energy was recorded (the key is in kilowatt-hours of total optical emissions from lightning.) The most powerful storm system is located over the Gulf Coast of Texas. MATLAB/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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MATLAB/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration