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Earl Maize (left), Cassini program manager at JPL, and Julie Webster, spacecraft operations team manager for the Cassini mission at Saturn, embrace after the Cassini spacecraft plunged into Saturn on Friday at precisely 7:55 a.m. ET. NASA/Joel Kowsky/(NASA/Joel Kowsky) hide caption

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NASA/Joel Kowsky/(NASA/Joel Kowsky)

NASA's Cassini probe has orbited Saturn for over a decade. This Friday, scientists will steer it into the gas giant's atmosphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Cassini Spacecraft Prepares For A Fiery Farewell In Saturn's Atmosphere

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Brady Helms, Wayne Kee and John Cosat keep an eye on Hurricane Irma from inside the emergency operations center at the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Al Feinberg/NASA hide caption

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Al Feinberg/NASA

In this photo taken by Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, the SpaceX Dragon capsule arrives at the International Space Station on Wednesday, stocked with scientific equipment, supplies — and ice cream. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

The Best Item In An Astronaut's Care Package? Definitely The Ice Cream

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Wally Funk is one of the Mercury 13, a group of women who trained to be astronauts in the early 1960s. Courtesy of Wally Funk hide caption

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Courtesy of Wally Funk

This Pilot Is Headed To Space With Or Without NASA

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The goals of the planetary protection officer are to protect the Earth and to protect other planets from being contaminated by substances from Earth during exploration. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Do You Have What It Takes To Be NASA's Next Planetary Protection Officer?

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Crew members on one of the simulated Mars missions this spring included Pitchayapa Jingjit (from left), Becky Parker, Elijah Espinoza and Esteban Ramirez. Community college students and teachers in real life, the team members spent a week in the Utah desert, partly to experience the isolation and challenges of a real trip to Mars. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

To Prepare For Mars Settlement, Simulated Missions Explore Utah's Desert

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The Apollo 11 capsule in in sore need of restoration, conservation specialists say, if it's to last another 50 years. Even the adhesive that helps holds stuff in place is losing its stickiness, and some objects inside are starting to pop off. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

Moonwalkers' Apollo 11 Capsule Gets Needed Primping For Its Star Turn On Earth

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NASA's 2017 astronaut candidates round up for a group photo on Tuesday at Ellington Field near Johnson Space Center. The 12 pictured are, front row, left to right, Zena Cardman, Jasmin Moghbeli, Robb Kulin, Jessica Watkins, Loral O'Hara; back row, left to right, Jonny Kim, Frank Rubio, Matthew Dominick, Warren Hoburg, Kayla Barron, Bob Hines and Raja Chari. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Meet Your Lucky Stars: NASA Announces A New Class Of Astronaut Candidates

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An artist's conception of the KELT-9 system, which has a host star (left) that's almost twice as hot as our sun. The hot star blasts its nearby planet KELT-9b, leading to a dayside surface temperature of around 7,800 degrees Fahrenheit. NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC) hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC)

Scientists Discover A Scorched Planet With A Comet-Like Tail

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