An artist's rendering of the BEAM inflatable annex attached to the side of the International Space Station. Courtesy of Bigelow Aerospace hide caption

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NASA To Test Inflatable Room For Astronauts In Space
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Bob Ebeling with his daughter Kathy (center) and his wife, Darlene. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Challenger Engineer Who Warned Of Shuttle Disaster Dies
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A Martian gravity map shows the Tharsis volcanoes and surrounding flexure. The white areas in the center are higher-gravity regions produced by the massive Tharsis volcanoes, and the surrounding blue areas are lower-gravity regions that may be cracks in the crust (lithosphere). MIT/UMBC-CRESST/GSFC via NASA hide caption

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NASA has set a new launch opportunity, beginning May 5, 2018, for the InSight mission to Mars. This artist's concept depicts the InSight lander on Mars after the lander's robotic arm has deployed a seismometer and a heat probe directly onto the ground. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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Expedition 43 NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (left) and his identical twin, Mark Kelly, pose for a photograph in 2015 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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'Everybody Stretches' Without Gravity: Mark Kelly Talks About NASA's Twins Study
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U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly shows a victory sign after landing safely on Earth after nearly a year in space. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Astronauts Back Home After A Year In Space
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Kelly posted this photo of an aurora taken from the International Space Station to Twitter on Aug. 15, 2015. NASA hide caption

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Scott Kelly Reflects On His Year Off The Planet
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A camera in the gondola of his balloon photographs Air Force Captain Joseph M. Kittinger Jr., as he starts the jump that set his record-breaking parachute jump over southern New Mexico on Aug. 8, 1960. Bettman/Corbis hide caption

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What It's Like To Freefall From 20 Miles Above The Earth
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Bob Ebeling, now 89, at his home in Brigham City, Utah. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Your Letters Helped Challenger Shuttle Engineer Shed 30 Years Of Guilt
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