Taliban Taliban

Pakistan's prime minister, Shahid Khaqan Abbasi (shown here Aug. 1), says that U.S. sanctions against Pakistan will only hurt its efforts to fight militants in the region. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images

Men look at the remains of their properties at the site of a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, July 24, 2017. A suicide car bomb killed dozens of people as well as the bomber early Monday morning in a western neighborhood of Afghanistan's capital where several prominent politicians reside, a government official said. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

The death toll from Wednesday's bomb attack in Kabul has risen to more than 150, according to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. He spoke at an international peace conference Tuesday in the Afghan capital. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images/Office of Press Counselor of Afghanistan Presidency hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images/Office of Press Counselor of Afghanistan Presidency

Security forces inspect the site of a massive explosion in a busy area not far from the German Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Wednesday. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Kabul Truck Bomb Kills At Least 80 People, Injures Hundreds More

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At a memorial on the Wazir Akbar Khan hilltop in Kabul on Sunday, activists pay tribute to the victims of Friday's Taliban-claimed attack on an army base. Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images

Soldiers from the 36th Infantry Division deployed to Afghanistan to help train and advise that country's military. The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan says thousands more such troops are needed there. Maj. Randall Stillinger/U.S. Army hide caption

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Maj. Randall Stillinger/U.S. Army

Members of the Taliban militia ride in vehicles during Afghanistan's annual Independence Day parade in Kabul on Aug. 19, 2001. Afghanistan was largely cut off from the world during the Taliban's rule from 1996 to 2001. That changed dramatically after the Sept. 11 attacks. Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images

Afghan security personnel patrol at the site of twin suicide bombings near the Defense Ministry in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Monday. Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

Afghan police train with their weapons in Lashkar Gah, Afghanistan, in July. Hundreds of U.S. troops are deployed to train and assist security forces in Helmand province, where the Taliban have recently made territorial gains. Abdul Khaliq/AP hide caption

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Abdul Khaliq/AP

Afghan police inspect the site in in Kabul, Afghanistan, where a bus convoy was attacked on Thursday. The buses carrying police cadets were targeted as they were on their way from the neighboring Maidan Wardak province to Kabul. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

A member of the Afghan army looks on as an artillery gun fires at Taliban fighters in the hills of Nangahar Province, in eastern Afghanistan, in 2015. NPR photographer David Gilkey, who was killed Sunday, embedded with the Afghan military on multiple occasions to see how it was faring in its fight against the Taliban. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

An Afghan commando stands on the tarmac, wearing night vision gear. The elite commandos are about to fly into an area controlled by Taliban fighters. Their mission: to sweep a village for Taliban fighters. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Under U.S. Air Cover, Afghan Commandos Chase The Elusive Taliban

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