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Born In The U.S., Raised In China: 'Satellite Babies' Have A Hard Time Coming Home

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Susan Frawley Eisele holds her 6-week-old son, Albert Jr., at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City in 1936. Eisele, of Blue Earth, Minn., won an essay contest with Country Home magazine and was named best American rural correspondent of 1936. Courtesy of Kitty Eisele hide caption

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Courtesy of Kitty Eisele

When Mrs. Eisele Took Manhattan: Big City Failed To Awe Minnesota Journalist

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New York Governor Andrew Cuomo (R) visits the scene of an explosion on West 23rd Street Sept. 18, 2016 in New York. An explosion rocked one of the most fashionable neighborhoods of New York, injuring 29 people, one seriously, a week after America's financial capital marked the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

A commemoration ceremony is held for the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on Sunday at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City. Spencer Platt /Getty Images hide caption

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Russell Mercer replaces old U.S. flags with new ones at the Flushing World Trade Center Memorial at Flushing Cemetery in New York City. His stepson, Scott Kopytko, was killed on Sept. 11. Alex Welsh for NPR hide caption

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Alex Welsh for NPR

Sept. 11 Families Face 'Strange, Empty Void' Without Victims' Remains

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A construction worker looks up at One World Trade Center in New York City, the central skyscraper under construction at Ground Zero, a year before its 2013 completion. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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For Those Who 'Worked The Pile' At Ground Zero, Horrors Of Sept. 11 Haven't Faded

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People look out at the former site of the World Trade Center in New York City in 2005, where construction had started on Freedom Tower. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Three World Trade Center is under construction near One World Trade Center, which was completed in 2013. The new building stands 1,079 feet tall, and its topping-out ceremony was held in June. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

In Ongoing Rebuilding Of Ground Zero, A Balance Of Remembrance, Resilience

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Eric Frumin (right) stands in front of his solar panels on the roof of his Brooklyn home alongside architect David Cunningham (left) and AeonSolar's Allen Frishman (center). Courtesy of Eric Frumin hide caption

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Courtesy of Eric Frumin

A CD-ROM containing two spreadsheets with names that New York City Board of Elections officials say were purged from voter rolls. Brigid Bergin/WNYC hide caption

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Brigid Bergin/WNYC

Why Voter Rolls Can Be A Mess

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