President George W. Bush (center) surveys the devastation in New Orleans with (from left to right) Vice Adm. Thad Allen, Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco, Mayor Ray Nagin and Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Sept. 12, 2005, two weeks after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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"Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job ..."

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Joel Munguia (center), owner of Chino's, a barbershop in Kenner, La., sits with his nephew, Waldyn Munguia (left), as they have a laugh outside on the waiting benches at the shop. Munguia came to New Orleans from Honduras in 2005 after Katrina and opened his dream shop for Latino hairstyles in 2012. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Some Moved On, Some Moved In And Made A New New Orleans

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Angela Chalk looks at a home in New Orleans' 7th Ward that hasn't been touched since Hurricane Katrina. Chalk, the vice president of the 7th Ward neighborhood association, spends some of her free time tracking down and reporting dilapidated and abandoned properties. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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New Orleans Neighborhoods Scrabble For Hope In Abandoned Ruins

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New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu speaks about New Orleans' emergence as a model of urban renewal and economic recovery 10 years after Hurricane Katrina during a visit Tuesday to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mayor Landrieu To Displaced New Orleanians: 'Y'all Can Come Home'

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Mayor Mike Smith stands near a mural, created by residents, that depicts Waveland before and after Katrina. Evelina Burnett/MPB hide caption

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A Decade After Katrina, Hopes Of Recovery Remain Unfulfilled In Waveland, Miss.

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