A Passover Seder table. During Passover, Jews avoid leavened bread. But whether legumes, corn and rice are OK has long been a point of contention among Jews of European and Middle Eastern ancestry. Now, rabbis have weighed in. Reza/Getty Images hide caption

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Beans And Rice For Passover? A Divisive Question Gets The Rabbis' OK
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The Passage of the Red Sea, illustration by William Hole (1846-1917). Exodus 14:16: "but lift thou up thy rod, and stretch out thine hand over the sea, and divide it: and the children of Israel shall go on dry ground through the midst of the sea." Corbis Images hide caption

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Manischewitz is closely associated with Jewish tradition, but it was once a huge crossover success. Sammy Davis Jr. was its spokesman in TV advertising. At one point, the typical drinker was described as an urban African-American man. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Wilderness Torah festival attendees take their Shabbat celebration outside the Tent of Meeting (at left) as the sun sets in the Panamint Valley of the Mojave Desert in 2014. At center in white, with both arms reaching up to the sky, is singer-songwriter Mikey Pauker. Shabbat participants are singing, drumming and playing guitars. Tom Levy hide caption

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Community Takes Passover Tradition Back To The Desert Wilderness
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Rev. Channing E. Phillips, (left) Rabbi Arthur Waskow, and Topper Carew on April 4, 1969, the night of the first Freedom Seder. Courtesy of Arthur Waskow hide caption

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In Freedom Seder, Jews And African-Americans Built A Tradition Together
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Matzo ball soup with dill. Matzo represents the unleavened bread the Jews ate while fleeing Egypt. Jessica and Lon Binder/Flickr hide caption

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Celebrating Passover: The History And Symbolism Of Matzo Balls
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A rabbi (center) supervises the production of Passover matzos at the Streit's factory on New York's Lower East Side, circa 1960s. This Passover will be Streit's last one at the landmark location. AP hide caption

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How The Matzo Crumbles: Iconic Streit's Factory To Leave Manhattan
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The holes in matzo give the cracker its characteristic crunch, Odelia Cohen/iStockphoto hide caption

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A Love Letter To Matzo: Why The Holey Cracker Is A Crunch Above
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A view of the medieval town of Ribadavia, in Galicia, in the north of Spain. José Antonio Gil Martínez/via Flickr hide caption

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