A juggler performs during an audition for a busking spot in the North Hall at Covent Garden Market. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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What Of London's "Beautiful Idiots And Brilliant Lunatics," Post-Brexit?

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Archaeological conservator Luisa Duarte holds a Roman waxed writing tablet at Bloomberg's London offices on Wednesday. This tablet contains the earliest written reference to London, dated A.D. 65-80; it reads "Londinio Mogontio" --€” that is, "in London, to Mogontius." Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A stately Georgian house at 29 Harley Street is home to Formations House, a company that specializes in creating other companies. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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1 Address, 2,000 Companies, And The Ease Of Doing Business In The U.K.

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In the opening scene of Another World: Losing Our Children to Islamic State, an actor playing a radical imam appears on stage. The play is a mix of journalism and theater, with its script based on the actual words, recorded in interviews, of mothers who lost children to ISIS, an American general and a former Guantanamo detainee. Courtesy of Tristram Kenton/National Theatre hide caption

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Examining The Lure Of ISIS In 'Another World'

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Sadiq Khan, whose Pakistani father was a bus driver in London for more than 25 years, has been elected mayor. He is the city's first Muslim mayor. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Conservative mayoral candidate Zac Goldsmith and his wife, Alice (left); Britain's Labour Party candidate Sadiq Khan and his wife, Saadiya. The candidates cast their votes on Thursday in hopes of becoming London's next mayor. Ben Stansall, Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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London Mayor Boris Johnson plays a guitar at an event to promote street performances in the city in March 2015. Johnson has broken ranks with Prime Minister David Cameron, a fellow Conservative Party member, by calling for Britain to leave the European Union. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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London's Popular And Populist Mayor Makes The Case For Leaving The EU

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After the pigeons are fitted with pollution sensors, they are released into different parts of London. Londoners can then get live air quality readings via Twitter. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

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Pigeons Are London's Newest Pollution Fighters

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Marina Litvinenko, whose husband died in 2006 after being poisoned, spoke to the media after a British court issued a report saying Alexander Litvinenko had been murdered. Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images hide caption

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This image, supplied by the Metropolitan Police, shows a view of the hole drilled in the vault wall at Hatton Garden Safe Deposit Ltd. following the Easter weekend robbery last year in London. Millions of dollars worth of jewels, cash and other valuable items were taken. Seven men have now pleaded or been found guilty. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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British police officers stand outside Leytonstone underground train station in east London on Monday. Police are stepping up patrols at transport hubs after Saturday's attack in which three people were stabbed. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Taxis wait in London in June 2014. By law, the drivers of London's black cabs must memorize all of the city's streets, a process that takes years of study. The taxi drivers are opposed to Uber and drivers using a GPS, but the High Court ruled in favor of Uber last week. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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London's Cabbies Say 'The Knowledge' Is Better Than Uber And A GPS

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