Trombonist and composer Reginald Cyntje was born in Dominica and raised in the U.S. Virgin Islands on a diet of reggae, calypso, classical and jazz. Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR hide caption

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A woman works in a factory processing hashish in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley in December 2014. Mohamed Azakir/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Escaping Syria To Harvest Hashish In Lebanon

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Radwan Mahmoud, a Syrian refugee, works as a laborer on a construction site in Lebanon. He's supporting 12 family members and earning about $16 a day. With a population of just over 4 million, Lebanon is host to more than 1 million Syrian refugees. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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As War Drags On, Syrian Refugees In Lebanon Sink Into Debt Trap

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People gather near the site of a twin suicide attack Thursday in Burj al-Barajneh, southern Beirut, Lebanon. The self-proclaimed Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Lea Hatouni is a Christian living in the predominantly Muslim Middle East. Like so many other Lebanese, she expects to have to leave Lebanon to start her career after college. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Why Lea Of Lebanon Wants To Leave Home: #15Girls

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She's a teenager with a cellphone, surfing the Internet. And she's a Syrian refugee who works in the fields up to 14 hours a day. That's the new life of 15-year-old Fatmeh, seen here in the living room area of her family's makeshift shelter. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

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A Teen Who Fled Syria Had High Hopes For Her Life In Lebanon: #15Girls

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Lebanese gather at a public beach in Beirut on Aug. 2. Lax governance has allowed developers to turn much of the coastline into private clubs, leaving a dwindling number of public beaches along the Mediterranean. Jamal Saidi/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Lebanon's Shrinking Public Beaches

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Members of the Syrian band Khebez Dawle include (from left to right) Hekmat Qassar on guitar and keyboards, lead guitarist Bashar Darwish, bassist Muhammad Bazz and lead singer Anas Maghrebi. Half the band members are now in Turkey, and are strongly considering seeking asylum in Europe. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Syrian Rockers, Fleeing War, Find Safety And New Fans In Beirut

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A Lebanese woman covers her nose as she walks past piles of garbage on a Beirut street. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Amid Political Dysfunction, Beirut Residents Suffer The Stench Of Garbage

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Syrian refugees live in makeshift shelters in the Beqaa Valley in Lebanon, just a few miles west of the Syrian border. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Lebanon Evicted Syrians From A Refugee Camp; They Refused To Go

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