Lebanon Lebanon

In Beirut, an audience listens to testimonies about encounters with the police over homosexuality. The event was part of Beirut Pride week – the city's first. Alison Meuse/NPR hide caption

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Alison Meuse/NPR

At Beirut's First Pride Week, A Chance To Celebrate — And Take Stock Of Challenges

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Maamoul, a shortbread cookie stuffed with date paste or chopped walnuts or pistachios and dusted with powdered sugar, is the perfect reward after a month of fasting during Ramadan and Lent. These cookies are waiting to be baked. Amy E. Robertson for NPR hide caption

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Amy E. Robertson for NPR

A group of students visits the Beirut mansion that architect Mona El Hallak is working to transform into a museum making sense of Lebanon's civil war. Alice Fordham /NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham /NPR

In A Bullet-Riddled Mansion, A Beirut Architect Envisions A Museum Of Memory

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Trombonist and composer Reginald Cyntje was born in Dominica and raised in the U.S. Virgin Islands on a diet of reggae, calypso, classical and jazz. Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR hide caption

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Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR

A woman works in a factory processing hashish in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley in December 2014. Mohamed Azakir/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mohamed Azakir/Reuters/Landov

Escaping Syria To Harvest Hashish In Lebanon

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Radwan Mahmoud, a Syrian refugee, works as a laborer on a construction site in Lebanon. He's supporting 12 family members and earning about $16 a day. With a population of just over 4 million, Lebanon is host to more than 1 million Syrian refugees. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

As War Drags On, Syrian Refugees In Lebanon Sink Into Debt Trap

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People gather near the site of a twin suicide attack Thursday in Burj al-Barajneh, southern Beirut, Lebanon. The self-proclaimed Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP

Lea Hatouni is a Christian living in the predominantly Muslim Middle East. Like so many other Lebanese, she expects to have to leave Lebanon to start her career after college. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Why Lea Of Lebanon Wants To Leave Home: #15Girls

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She's a teenager with a cellphone, surfing the Internet. And she's a Syrian refugee who works in the fields up to 14 hours a day. That's the new life of 15-year-old Fatmeh, seen here in the living room area of her family's makeshift shelter. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

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Dalia Khamissy for NPR

A Teen Who Fled Syria Had High Hopes For Her Life In Lebanon: #15Girls

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Lebanese gather at a public beach in Beirut on Aug. 2. Lax governance has allowed developers to turn much of the coastline into private clubs, leaving a dwindling number of public beaches along the Mediterranean. Jamal Saidi/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Jamal Saidi/Reuters /Landov

Lebanon's Shrinking Public Beaches

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