Super Bowl Super Bowl

The brain of former NFL star Junior Seau, who committed suicide last year, showed signs of the kind of neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive head trauma. Elsa/Getty Images hide caption

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Head coach Jim Harbaugh (left) of the San Francisco 49ers and his brother, head coach John Harbaugh of the Baltimore Ravens, before a game on Thanksgiving Day 2011. Their teams will meet again in the Super Bowl. Rob Carr/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Carr/Getty Images

From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Mike Pesca on the Ravens' win

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M.I.A.'s now famous finger during halftime of the Super Bowl. Christopher Polk/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Polk/Getty Images

Flipping 'The Bird' Just Isn't Obscene Anymore, Law Professor Argues

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New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning holds the Vince Lombardi Trophy after the NFL Super Bowl XLVI game against the New England Patriots, Sunday (Feb. 5, 2012). Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

NPR's Mike Pesca reports on the Super Bowl

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Indiana laws bar all carryout alcohol sales on Sundays, leaving Super Bowl revelers in the lurch in their quest for any 11th-hour 12-pack the day of the big game. At Kahn's Fine Wines and Spirits in Indianapolis earlier this week, Bill Cheek was putting labels on cases of beer. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Michel Martin talks to Indianapolis Mayor Gregory Ballard

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President Barack Obama shakes hands with former Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon as he hosts the 1985 Chicago Bears football team at the White House. The visit was a make-up trip for the Super Bowl XX champions, whose original reception was cancelled in 1986.

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Charles Dharapak/AP

1985 Chicago Bears Finally Get Their Due With White House Visit

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