Navigation aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Stout is done by computer, as is the case on many other ships. The U.S. Navy now wants more of its officers proficient in celestial navigation. Amanda Gray/U.S. Navy hide caption

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U.S. Navy Brings Back Navigation By The Stars For Officers

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Officials attend the launch of a Positive Train Control system for Los Angeles' Metrolink commuter trains in February 2014 at Los Angeles Union Station. Congress mandated the technology after a Metrolink engineer ran a red light while he was texting and crashed head-on with a freight train in 2008. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Red Tape Slows Control System That Could Have Saved Speeding Train

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The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters. Greg E. Mathieson Sr./Mai/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Greg E. Mathieson Sr./Mai/Landov

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

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Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Antares rocket lifts off at Wallops Island, Va., in April of last year. The Antares uses a pair of Russian-made NK-33 rocket engines that Moscow says it will stop supplying for military launches. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Crews work a controlled burn in Geneva, Fla., in December. The state's forest service has rolled out a system to track equipment during fires, and hopes it can eventually be used to pinpoint firefighters, too. Joshua C. Cruey/Courtesy of the Orlando Sentinel hide caption

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Technology Tracks Crews Through The Fog Of Wildfire

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