On March 23, a man unloads fish from the U.S. fishing vessel the Sea Dragon at Pier 38 in Honolulu. According to an Associated Press report, Americans buying Hawaiian seafood are almost certainly eating fish caught by foreign workers hired through a U.S. government loophole that allows them jobs but exempts them from most basic workplace protections. Caleb Jones/AP hide caption

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Archipelago, in Washington, D.C., is among a wave of new tiki bars across the country. But how do South Pacific islanders feel about tiki kitsch? Frank N. Carlson/Courtesy of Archipelago hide caption

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Let's Talk Tiki Bars: Harmless Fun Or Exploitation?

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Rough seas prevented the NOAA's Okeanos Explorer from collecting data in the the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in February. NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration hide caption

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Take it one syllable at a time: Papahānaumokuākea

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The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world. Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society hide caption

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Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

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The Solar Impulse 2 airplane, piloted by Bertrand Piccard, gains altitude after taking off from Kalaeloa Airport in Kapolei, Hawaii during a test and training flight in April. Eugene Tanner /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Politician Takes To Tinder To Ignite Voters' Interest

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