Biryani is a popular South Asian dish made with rice and meat, fish or vegetables. Though it is rarely made with beef, it has recently become the target of some Hindu activists in India who want to protect the holy cow. John S Lander/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John S Lander/LightRocket via Getty Images

Jacqueline de Chollet of Switzerland, now 78, helped found the Veerni Institute, which gives child brides and other girls in northern India a chance to continue their education. Yana Paskova for NPR hide caption

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Yana Paskova for NPR

A Chance Encounter On A Vacation Changed Her Life — And The Lives Of Child Brides

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Gautam Lewis, now 39, poses with some of the photographs he has taken that trace the life and work of Mother Teresa, who took him in when he was 3. The images are part of an exhibition Lewis has staged in Kolkata as an homage to the woman he calls his "second mother." Rohan Chakravarty for NPR hide caption

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Rohan Chakravarty for NPR

Mother Teresa Made Him Believe He Could Fly — And He Did

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Durga studies for final exams in her second year of college. Swati Vashishtha for NPR hide caption

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Swati Vashishtha for NPR

A Father Vows To Save His Daughter From A Marriage He Forced Her Into

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The man with the bandaged heads is one of the four members of the Dalit community who were flogged with iron rods and pipes on July 11 by group of self-styled "cow protectors." Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Hindustan Times via Getty Images

The Caste Formerly Known As 'Untouchables' Demands A New Role In India

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Indian government forces douse a burning tire left by protesters in the Kashmiri city of Srinagar. Violence has swept through the disputed region since separatist rebel Burhan Wani was killed by the Indian army on Friday. Yawar Nazir/Getty Images hide caption

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A boat approaches Ghoramara island in India's Sundarbans. Most traffic goes the other way, as thousands of Ghoramara residents have left the flood-prone island in recent years. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

The Vanishing Islands Of India's Sundarbans

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Ambadas Raut uses copper rods known as dowsing sticks to locate sources of underground water in a dry reservoir. He's had 400 clients and says he's found water for 80 percent of them. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

Are Indians Turning To The 'Supernatural' In Subterranean Search For Water?

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Debnath Mondal (front right), who survived a tiger attack in 2010, patrols the banks of the Sundarbans tiger preserve with another forest guard and a boat skipper. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Debendra Tarek, 80, inspects a handful of salt-resistant rice in his home on the tidal island of Ghoramara, which is shrinking quickly because of climate change. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR