Indian government forces douse a burning tire left by protesters in the Kashmiri city of Srinagar. Violence has swept through the disputed region since separatist rebel Burhan Wani was killed by the Indian army on Friday. Yawar Nazir/Getty Images hide caption

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A boat approaches Ghoramara island in India's Sundarbans. Most traffic goes the other way, as thousands of Ghoramara residents have left the flood-prone island in recent years. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The Vanishing Islands Of India's Sundarbans

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Ambadas Raut uses copper rods known as dowsing sticks to locate sources of underground water in a dry reservoir. He's had 400 clients and says he's found water for 80 percent of them. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Are Indians Turning To The 'Supernatural' In Subterranean Search For Water?

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Debnath Mondal (front right), who survived a tiger attack in 2010, patrols the banks of the Sundarbans tiger preserve with another forest guard and a boat skipper. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Debendra Tarek, 80, inspects a handful of salt-resistant rice in his home on the tidal island of Ghoramara, which is shrinking quickly because of climate change. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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On a new episode of The Mindy Project, Dr. Mindy Lahiri decided to embrace her Indian roots, taking her son for a Hindu head-shaving ceremony. Evans Vestal Ward/Universal Television hide caption

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Dr. Gita Prakash (left), who runs a family clinic from her home in New Delhi, examines 10-year-old Sonu Kumar Chaudhary as his father, restaurant deliveryman Dilip Kumar Chaudhary, looks on. Prakash sees more and more cases of illness caused by the city's polluted air. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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India's Big Battle: Development Vs. Pollution

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A special hearth (left) for "green" cremations uses less wood and takes less time than traditional cremations. The new cremation method cuts down on air pollution. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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In India, Eco-Friendly Cremation Is Easy — But It's A Tough Sell

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